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The Two Revolutions, Landed Elites and Education during the Industrial Revolution

Author

Listed:
  • Duarte Nuno Leite

    () (Munich Cenyter for Economics of Aging)

  • Óscar Afonso

    () (University of Porto, Faculty of Economics)

  • Sandra Tavares Silva

    () (University of Porto, Faculty of Economics)

Abstract

How we are to understand the Industrial Revolution, the process of transition from a Malthusian equilibrium to today’s Modern Economic Growth, has been the subject of passionate debate. This paper adds more insights to the process of industrialization and the demographic transition that followed this period. By applying the theory of interest groups to landownership and by analyzing landed elites incentives to allow education, it is shown that their political power is important for an understanding of the main events that marked the Industrial Revolution. Contributions are also made to the existence and role of the Agricultural Revolution. It is advanced that it played a significant role in hastening the process of industrialization. A model and numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate these results.

Suggested Citation

  • Duarte Nuno Leite & Óscar Afonso & Sandra Tavares Silva, 2015. "The Two Revolutions, Landed Elites and Education during the Industrial Revolution," FEP Working Papers 562, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
  • Handle: RePEc:por:fepwps:562
    as

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    File URL: http://www.fep.up.pt/investigacao/workingpapers/wp562.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrial and Agricultural Revolution; Demographic Transition; Education; Interest Groups.;

    JEL classification:

    • N53 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth

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