IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The End of Import-Led Growth? North Korean Evidence

  • Sumie Sato

    (Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University)

  • Mototsugu Fukushige

    (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka university)

In this paper, we investigate causal relationships among exports, imports, and economic growth in North Korea by using time series data for the period between 1964 and 2004. The empirical results show that there was Granger causality from imports to GNP in the first half of the period. However, there was a causal relationship from GNP to imports in the second half of the period. This implies that economic growth stimulates imports in North Korea. The North Korean economy escaped its import-led growth situation, which some socialist economies had experienced.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www2.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/global/dp/0738.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) in its series Discussion Papers in Economics and Business with number 07-38.

as
in new window

Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:0738
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Toda, Hiro Y. & Yamamoto, Taku, 1995. "Statistical inference in vector autoregressions with possibly integrated processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1-2), pages 225-250.
  2. Urvashi Dhawan & Bagala Biswal, 1999. "Re-examining export-led growth hypothesis: a multivariate cointegration analysis for India," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(4), pages 525-530.
  3. Titus Awokuse, 2005. "Export-led growth and the Japanese economy: evidence from VAR and directed acyclic graphs," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(14), pages 849-858.
  4. Noland, Marcus & Robinson, Sherman & Scatasta, Monica, 1997. "Modeling economic reform in North Korea," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 15-38.
  5. Kim, Woon Keun & Lee, Hyunok & Sumner, Daniel A, 1998. "Assessing the Food Situation in North Korea," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(3), pages 519-35, April.
  6. Jordan Shan & Fiona Sun, 1998. "On the export-led growth hypothesis: the econometric evidence from China," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(8), pages 1055-1065.
  7. Abdulnasser Hatemi-J & Manuchehr Irandoust, 2001. "Time-series evidence for Balassa's export-led growth hypothesis," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 355-365.
  8. Jang C. Jin, 2003. "Openness and Growth in North Korea: Evidence from Time--Series Data," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 18-27, February.
  9. Noland, Marcus & Robinson, Sherman & Wang, Tao, 2001. "Famine in North Korea: Causes and Cures," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(4), pages 741-67, July.
  10. Noland, Marcus & Robinson, Sherman & Wang, Tao, 2000. "Rigorous Speculation: The Collapse and Revival of the North Korean Economy," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(10), pages 1767-1787, October.
  11. Jang Jin & Eden Yu, 1996. "Export-led growth and the US economy: another look," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(5), pages 341-344.
  12. Bagala Biswal & Urvashi Dhawan, 1998. "Export-led growth hypothesis: cointegration and causality analysis for Taiwan," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(11), pages 699-701.
  13. Subrata Ghatak & Chris Milner & Utku Utkulu, 1997. "Exports, export composition and growth : cointegration and causality evidence for Malaysia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(2), pages 213-223.
  14. Marcus Noland, 2006. "Transition from the Bottom-Up: Institutional Change in North Korea," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 48(2), pages 195-212, June.
  15. Jordan Shan & Fiona Sun, 1999. "Export-led growth and the US economy: some further testing," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 169-172.
  16. Marcus Noland & Sherman Robinson & Tao Wang, 1999. "Modeling Korean Unification," Working Paper Series WP99-7, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  17. Khalid Yousif Khalafalla & Alan Webb, 2001. "Export-led growth and structural change: evidence from Malaysia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(13), pages 1703-1715.
  18. Chen, Kang & Jefferson, Gary H. & Singh, Inderjit, 1992. "Lessons from China's economic reform," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 201-225, June.
  19. Andy Kwan & John Cotsomitis & Benjamin Kwok, 1999. "Exports, economic growth and structural invariance: evidence from some Asian NICs," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(4), pages 493-498.
  20. Shandre Mugan Thangavelu & Gulasekaran Rajaguru, 2004. "Is there an export or import-led productivity growth in rapidly developing Asian countries? a multivariate VAR analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(10), pages 1083-1093.
  21. Suk-In Chang, 1997. "The Effects of Economic Integration Between North and South Korea: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 1-16.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:0738. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Atsuko SUZUKI)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.