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How Robust are Money Demand Estimations? A Meta-Analytic Approach

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Abstract

In this paper we perform a meta-analysis of empirical money demand studies involving almost 500 individual money demand estimations. We analyze whether the wide variety of results can be explained by characteristics of the studies, different macroeconomic environments or the imprecision of individual estimates. We find that estimates for the income elasticity of money are systematically related to various study characteristics (e.g., broadness of the monetary aggregate, inclusion of financial innovation and wealth, etc). Also, the macroeconomic environment (inflation, nominal and real uncertainties) seems to play a role. Nevertheless, a substantial part of the variability remains unexplained. Our findings thus raise some doubts about the robustness and reliability of money demand estimations.

Suggested Citation

  • Markus Knell & Helmut Stix, 2003. "How Robust are Money Demand Estimations? A Meta-Analytic Approach," Working Papers 81, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
  • Handle: RePEc:onb:oenbwp:81
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    1. Carlson, John B. & Hoffman, Dennis L. & Keen, Benjamin D. & Rasche, Robert H., 2000. "Results of a study of the stability of cointegrating relations comprised of broad monetary aggregates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 345-383, October.
    2. Ball, Laurence, 2001. "Another look at long-run money demand," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 31-44, February.
    3. Goldfeld, Stephen M. & Sichel, Daniel E., 1990. "The demand for money," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: B. M. Friedman & F. H. Hahn (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 299-356 Elsevier.
    4. Pantelis Kalaitzidakis & Theofanis P. Mamuneas & Thanasis Stengos, 2003. "Rankings of Academic Journals and Institutions in Economics," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(6), pages 1346-1366, December.
    5. Katrin Wesche, 1997. "The Stability of European Money Demand: An Investigation of M3H," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 371-391, October.
    6. Alan B. Krueger, 2003. "Economic Considerations and Class Size," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 34-63, February.
    7. T. D. Stanley, 2001. "Wheat from Chaff: Meta-analysis as Quantitative Literature Review," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 131-150, Summer.
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    Cited by:

    1. Egert, Balazs & Halpern, Laszlo, 2006. "Equilibrium exchange rates in Central and Eastern Europe: A meta-regression analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1359-1374, May.
    2. repec:onb:oenbwp:y::i:88:b:1 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Michael Graff, 2008. "The Quantity Theory of Money in Historical Perspective," KOF Working papers 08-196, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    4. Salvatore Capasso & Oreste Napolitano, 2012. "Testing for the stability of money demand in Italy: has the Euro influenced the monetary transmission mechanism?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(24), pages 3121-3133, August.
    5. Ángel Melguizo & José González-Páramo, 2013. "Who bears labour taxes and social contributions? A meta-analysis approach," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 247-271, August.
    6. Balazs Egert & Carol Leonard, 2008. "Dutch Disease Scare in Kazakhstan: Is it real?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 147-165, April.
    7. Paul De Grauwe & Cláudia Costa Storti, 2004. "The Effects of Monetary Policy: A Meta-Analysis," CESifo Working Paper Series 1224, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Balázs Égert & Carol S. Leonard, 2006. "The Dutch Disease in Kazakhstan: An Empirical Investigation," Focus on European Economic Integration, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 2, pages 85-108.
    9. Markus Knell & Helmut Stix, 2006. "Three decades of money demand studies: differences and similarities," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(7), pages 805-818.
    10. Balázs Égert & Ronald MacDonald, 2006. "Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Transition Economies: Surveying the Surveyable," MNB Working Papers 2006/5, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).
    11. René Cabral-Torres, "undated". "Monetary and Fiscal Policy Coordination," Discussion Papers 05/28, Department of Economics, University of York.
    12. Boriss Siliverstovs, 2008. "Dynamic modelling of the demand for money in Latvia," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 8(1), pages 53-74, October.
    13. Balázs Égert & Doris Ritzberger-Grünwald & Maria Antoinette Silgoner, 2004. "Inflation Differentials in Europe: Past Experience and Future Prospects," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 47-72.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Money Demand; Meta Analysis; Empirical Methods;

    JEL classification:

    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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