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Estimation of the Money Demand Function in Russia

Author

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  • Sosunov, K.

    (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia)

Abstract

In this paper following Ball (2012) we estimate the demand function for narrow money aggregate M1 in Russia for 2003-2012. We show that after inclusion of cash foreign exchange and relevant interest rate the money demand is stable in the long- and the short-run and estimated long-run elasticities and short-run dynamics of the money demand yields sensible values for the simple functional form. We also show that most of the short-run volatility of the money holding can be attributed to the slow speed of adjustment of the demand not to the unexplained shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Sosunov, K., 2013. "Estimation of the Money Demand Function in Russia," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 18(2), pages 89-99.
  • Handle: RePEc:nea:journl:y:2013:i:18:p:89-99
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Iikka Korhonen & Aaron Mehrotra, 2010. "Money Demand in Post-Crisis Russia: Dedollarization and Remonetization," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 5-19, March.
    2. William Poole, 1969. "Optimal choice of monetary policy instruments in a simple stochastic macro model," Special Studies Papers 2, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Ball, Laurence, 2001. "Another look at long-run money demand," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 31-44, February.
    4. Goldfeld, Stephen M. & Sichel, Daniel E., 1990. "The demand for money," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: B. M. Friedman & F. H. Hahn (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 299-356 Elsevier.
    5. Friedman, Benjamin M, 1988. "Lessons on Monetary Policy from the 1980s," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 51-72, Summer.
    6. Feige, Edgar L., 1990. "Defining and estimating underground and informal economies: The new institutional economics approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 18(7), pages 989-1002, July.
    7. Mehrotra, Aaron & Ponomarenko, Alexey, 2010. "Wealth effects and Russian money demand," BOFIT Discussion Papers 13/2010, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    8. Ball, Laurence, 2012. "Short-run money demand," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(7), pages 622-633.
    9. Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Michael P. Barry, 2000. "Stability of the Demand for Money in an Unstable Country: Russia," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(4), pages 619-629, July.
    10. Oomes, Nienke & Ohnsorge, Franziska, 2005. "Money demand and inflation in dollarized economies: The case of Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 462-483, September.
    11. Duca, John V, 2000. "Financial Technology Shocks and the Case of the Missing M2," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(4), pages 820-839, November.
    12. William Poole, 1970. "Optimal Choice of Monetary Policy Instruments in a Simple Stochastic Macro Model," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(2), pages 197-216.
    13. Stephen M. Goldfeld, 1973. "The Demand for Money Revisited," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 4(3), pages 577-646.
    14. Judd, John P & Scadding, John L, 1982. "The Search for a Stable Money Demand Function: A Survey of the Post-1973 Literature," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 20(3), pages 993-1023, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrei Polbin & Sergey Drobyshevsky, 2014. "Developing a Dynamic Stochastic Model of General Equilibrium for the Russian Economy," Research Paper Series, Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy, issue 166P, pages 156-156.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    macroeconomics; money demand; Russia;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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