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A New Measure of Skills Mismatch: Theory and Evidence from the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC)

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  • Michele Pellizzari

    (OECD)

  • Anne Fichen

    (OECD)

Abstract

This paper proposes a new measure of skills mismatch that combines information about skill proficiency, self-reported mismatch and skill use. The theoretical foundations underling this measure allow identifying minimum and maximum skill requirements for each occupation and to classify workers into three groups, the well-matched, the under-skilled and the over-skilled. The availability of skill use data further permit the computation of the degree of under and overusage of skills in the economy. The empirical analysis is carried out using the first wave of the OECD Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) and the findings are compared across skill domains, labour market status and countries. Ce document présente une nouvelle mesure de l’inadéquation des compétences qui combine des informations sur la maîtrise des compétences, l’inadéquation auto-reportée et l’utilisation des compétences. Les fondements théoriques de cette mesure permettent d’identifier les compétences minimales et maximales requises par chaque profession et de classer les travailleurs en trois groupes : ceux dont les compétences sont bien adaptées, ceux qui ont des compétences inférieures à celles requises et ceux qui ont des compétences supérieures à celles requises. L’existence de données sur l’usage des compétences permet de mesurer le degré de sur- ou de sous-utilisation des compétences dans l’économie. Cette mesure est testée sur la première vague de l’enquête de l’OCDE sur l’évaluation des compétences des adultes ; les résultats sont présentés par domaines de compétences, par statuts sur le marché du travail et par pays.

Suggested Citation

  • Michele Pellizzari & Anne Fichen, 2013. "A New Measure of Skills Mismatch: Theory and Evidence from the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC)," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 153, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:elsaab:153-en
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard Desjardins & Kjell Rubenson, 2011. "An Analysis of Skill Mismatch Using Direct Measures of Skills," OECD Education Working Papers 63, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1423-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Lucía Mateos Romero & María del Mar Salinas Jiménez, 2016. "El uso de las competencias en el puesto de trabajo: un análisis para el caso español con PIAAC," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 11,in: José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 11, edition 1, volume 11, chapter 44, pages 795-822 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    3. Cim, Merve & Kind, Michael Sebastian & Kleibrink, Jan, 2017. "Occupational mismatch of immigrants in Europe: The role of education and cognitive skills," Ruhr Economic Papers 687, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    4. Sandra Nieto, 2015. "Overeducation, skills and wage penalty: Evidence for Spain using PIAAC data," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 10,in: Marta Rahona López & Jennifer Graves (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 10, edition 1, volume 10, chapter 30, pages 597-616 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    5. Marie Le Mouel & Mariagrazia Squicciarini, 2015. "Cross-Country Estimates of Employment and Investment in Organisational Capital: A Task-Based Methodology Using Piaac Data," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers 2015/8, OECD Publishing.
    6. repec:iza:izawol:journl:y:2017:n:391 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Simona Nicolae, 2014. "The Impact Of The Economic Crisis On Human Resource In Romania," Manager Journal, Faculty of Business and Administration, University of Bucharest, vol. 20(1), pages 80-91, December.
    8. Lucia Mateos & Ines Murillo & Maria del Mar Salinas, 2014. "Desajuste educativo y competencias cognitivas: efectos sobre los salarios," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 210(3), pages 85-108, September.
    9. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Russo, Giovanni, 2015. "Heterogeneity of Skill Needs and Job Complexity: Evidence from the OECD PIAAC Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 9392, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Marie Le Mouel & Mariagrazia Squicciarini, 2015. "Cross-Country Estimates of Employment and Investment in Organisational Capital: A Task-Based Methodology Using the PIAAC Database," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1522, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    11. Olga Kupets, 2015. "Education in transition and job mismatch: Evidence from the skills survey in non-EU transition economies," KIER Working Papers 915, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    12. Matteo Bugamelli & Francesca Lotti & Monica Amici & Emanuela Ciapanna & Fabrizio Colonna & Francesco D’Amuri & Silvia Giacomelli & Andrea Linarello & Francesco Manaresi & Giuliana Palumbo & Filippo Sc, 2018. "Productivity growth in Italy: a tale of a slow-motion change," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 422, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    mismatch; skills;

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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