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Overeducation, undereducation and the British labour market


  • P. J. Sloane
  • H. Battu
  • P. T. Seaman


This paper addresses the issue of overeducation and undereducation using for the first time a British dataset which contains explicit information on the level of required education to enter a job across the generality of occupations. Three key issues within the overeducation literature are addressed. First, what determines the existence of over and undereducation and to what extent are over and undereducation substitutes for experience, tenure and training? Second, to what extent are over and undereducation temporary or permanent phenomena? Third, what are the returns to over and undereducation and do certain stylized facts discovered for the US and a number of European countries hold for Britain?

Suggested Citation

  • P. J. Sloane & H. Battu & P. T. Seaman, 1999. "Overeducation, undereducation and the British labour market," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(11), pages 1437-1453.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:31:y:1999:i:11:p:1437-1453
    DOI: 10.1080/000368499323319

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    References listed on IDEAS

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