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Regional Convergence and Catch-up in India between 1960 and 1992

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    This paper examines the evidence for regional convergence or catch-up in levels and growth rates of per capita income among the 16 major states in India between 1960 and 1992. The results - estimated using OLS, the within-group LSDV estimator, Re-Weighted Least Squares, and Least Trimmed Squares - establish that unconditional convergence in growth rates does not obtain, but that there is clear and robust evidence of conditional convergence. This suggests that important differences between observed state incomes are likely to be caused by different steady-state incomes, to which convergence occurs. The cross-state income distribution is analyzed and the greater polarization between states in terms of levels of income is established using measures of dispersion and kernel density estimates. A tentative conclusion is that a small group of states are pulling away from the rest of the distribution, causing an incipient second peak.

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    File URL: http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk/economics/papers/2003/W1/convergencewp1.pdf
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    Paper provided by Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford in its series Economics Papers with number 2003-W01.

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    Length: 34 pages
    Date of creation:
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    Handle: RePEc:nuf:econwp:0301
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk/economics/

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    8. Jonathan Temple, 1999. "The New Growth Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 112-156, March.
    9. Temple, Jonathan, 2000. "Growth Regressions and What the Textbooks Don't Tell You," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 181-205, July.
    10. Quah, Danny, 1997. "Empirics for Growth and Distribution: Stratification, Polarization, and Convergence Clubs," CEPR Discussion Papers 1586, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Rayaprolu Nagaraj & Aristomène Varoudakis & Marie-Ange Véganzonès, 1998. "Long-Run Growth Trends and Convergence Across Indian States," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 131, OECD Publishing.
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    15. Caselli, Francesco & Esquivel, Gerardo & Lefort, Fernando, 1996. " Reopening the Convergence Debate: A New Look at Cross-Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 363-89, September.
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