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Market Size, Linkages, and Productivity: A Study of Japanese Regions

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  • Donald R. Davis
  • David E. Weinstein

Abstract

One account of spatial concentration focuses on productivity advantages arising from market size. We investigate this for forty regions of Japan. Our results identify important effects of a region's own size, as well as cost linkages between producers and suppliers of inputs. Productivity links to a more general form of 'market potential' or Marshall-Arrow-Romer externalities do not appear to be robust in our data. Landlocked status does not matter for productivity of regions in Japan. The effects we identify are economically quite important, accounting for a substantial portion of cross-regional productivity differences. A simple counterfactual shows that if economic activity were spread evenly over the forty regions of Japan, aggregate output would fall by nearly twenty percent.

Suggested Citation

  • Donald R. Davis & David E. Weinstein, 2001. "Market Size, Linkages, and Productivity: A Study of Japanese Regions," NBER Working Papers 8518, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8518
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Davis, Donald R. & David E. Weinstein & Scott C. Bradford & Kazushige Shimpo, 1997. "Using International and Japanese Regional Data to Determine When the Factor Abundance Theory of Trade Works," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 421-446, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Böckerman, Petri, 2002. "Understanding Regional Productivity in a Nordic Welfare State: Does ICT Matter?," Discussion Papers 798, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    2. Zeng, Dao-Zhi & Zhao, Laixun, 2010. "Globalization, interregional and international inequalities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 352-361, May.
    3. Masayuki Morikawa, 2011. "Economies of Density and Productivity in Service Industries: An Analysis of Personal Service Industries Based on Establishment-Level Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(1), pages 179-192, February.
    4. Volker Nocke, 2006. "A Gap for Me: Entrepreneurs and Entry," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(5), pages 929-956, September.
    5. Edward L. Glaeser & Joshua D. Gottlieb, 2009. "The Wealth of Cities: Agglomeration Economies and Spatial Equilibrium in the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(4), pages 983-1028, December.
    6. Ben Gardiner & Ron Martin & Tyler Peter, 2004. "Competitiveness, Productivity and Economic Growth across the European Regions," ERSA conference papers ersa04p333, European Regional Science Association.
    7. N. Domeque Claver & C. Fillat Castejón & F. Sanz Gracia, 2012. "External economies as a mechanism of agglomeration in EU manufacturing," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(34), pages 4421-4438, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics

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