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Strategy-proofness in the Large

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  • Eduardo M. Azevedo
  • Eric Budish

Abstract

We propose a criterion of approximate incentive compatibility, strategy-proofness in the large (SP-L), and argue that it is a useful second-best to exact strategy-proofness (SP) for market design. Conceptually, SP-L requires that an agent who regards a mechanism’s “prices” as exogenous to her report – be they traditional prices as in an auction mechanism, or price-like statistics in an assignment or matching mechanism – has a dominant strategy to report truthfully. Mathematically, SP-L weakens SP in two ways: (i) truth-telling is required to be approximately optimal (within epsilon in a large enough market) rather than exactly optimal, and (ii) incentive compatibility is evaluated ex interim, with respect to all full-support i.i.d. probability distributions of play, rather than ex post with respect to all possible realizations of play. This places SP-L in between the traditional notion of approximate strategy-proofness, which evaluates incentives to manipulate ex post, and the traditional notion of approximate Bayes-Nash incentive compatibility, which evaluates incentives to manipulate ex interim with respect to the single common-knowledge probability distribution associated with Bayes-Nash equilibrium.

Suggested Citation

  • Eduardo M. Azevedo & Eric Budish, 2017. "Strategy-proofness in the Large," NBER Working Papers 23771, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23771
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • D44 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Auctions
    • D47 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Market Design
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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