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The U.S. listing gap

Author

Listed:
  • Craig Doidge
  • G. Andrew Karolyi
  • René M. Stulz

Abstract

The U.S. had 14% fewer exchange-listed firms in 2012 than in 1975. Relative to other countries, the U.S. now has abnormally few listed firms given its level of development and the quality of its institutions. We call this the “U.S. listing gap” and investigate possible explanations for it. We rule out industry changes, changes in listing requirements, and the reforms of the early 2000s as explanations for the gap. We show that the probability that a firm is listed has fallen since the listing peak in 1996 for all firm size categories though more so for smaller firms. From 1997 to the end of our sample period in 2012, the new list rate is low and the delist rate is high compared to U.S. history and to other countries. High delists account for roughly 46% of the listing gap and low new lists for 54%. The high delist rate is explained by an unusually high rate of acquisitions of publicly-listed firms compared to previous U.S. history and to other countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Craig Doidge & G. Andrew Karolyi & René M. Stulz, 2015. "The U.S. listing gap," NBER Working Papers 21181, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:21181
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w21181.pdf
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    Other versions of this item:

    • Doidge, Craig & Karolyi, George Andrew & Stulz, Rene M., 2015. "The U.S. Listing Gap," Working Paper Series 2015-07, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    10. Leuz, Christian, 2007. "Was the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 really this costly? A discussion of evidence from event returns and going-private decisions," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1-2), pages 146-165, September.
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    16. Doidge, Craig & Karolyi, G. Andrew & Stulz, René M., 2013. "The U.S. left behind? Financial globalization and the rise of IPOs outside the U.S," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(3), pages 546-573.
    17. repec:hrv:faseco:30728041 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. René M. Stulz, 1999. "Golbalization, Corporate Finance, And The Cost Of Capital," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 12(3), pages 8-25.
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    Cited by:

    1. Koedijk, Kees & Mahieu, Ronald J & ter Horst, Jenke & van Toor, Joris, 2017. "The World We Live In: Local or Global?," CEPR Discussion Papers 11831, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage
    • G30 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - General
    • G34 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Mergers; Acquisitions; Restructuring; Corporate Governance
    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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