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The New Full-time Employment Taxes

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  • Casey B. Mulligan

Abstract

The Affordable Care Act introduces or expands taxes on incomes and full-time employment, beginning in 2014. The purpose of this paper is to characterize the new full-time employment taxes from the perspective of a household budget constraint, measure their magnitude, and assess their likely consequences for employee work schedules. When the ACA is fully implemented, full-time employment taxes will be prevalent and often as large as what workers can earn in five hours of work per week, 52 weeks per year. The economic significance of the ACA's full-time employment taxes varies by demographic group: they are non-monotonic in age, increasing with family size, and negatively correlated with schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Casey B. Mulligan, 2014. "The New Full-time Employment Taxes," NBER Working Papers 20580, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20580
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Casey Mulligan, 2015. "Fiscal policies and the prices of labor: a comparison of the U.K. and U.S," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-27, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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