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Source of health insurance coverage and employment survival among newly disabled workers: Evidence from the health and retirement study

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  • Matthew J. Hill
  • Nicole Maestas
  • Kathleen J. Mullen

Abstract

We use prospective longitudinal data on newly disabled older workers to examine the effect of employer sponsorship of health insurance (ESHI) on post-onset employment and disability insurance claiming. We compare outcomes of workers with ESHI and no access to spousal coverage prior to onset with outcomes of two comparison groups: individuals with ESHI who also have access to spousal coverage and those who are covered by a spouse’s employer prior to onset. We find evidence of "employment lock" among the 20 percent of individuals whose disabilities do not impact their immediate physical capacity but are associated with high medical costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew J. Hill & Nicole Maestas & Kathleen J. Mullen, 2014. "Source of health insurance coverage and employment survival among newly disabled workers: Evidence from the health and retirement study," Economics Working Papers 1451, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  • Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:1451
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bradley, Cathy J. & Neumark, David & Barkowski, Scott, 2013. "Does employer-provided health insurance constrain labor supply adjustments to health shocks? New evidence on women diagnosed with breast cancer," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 833-849.
    2. Nicole Maestas & Kathleen J. Mullen & Alexander Strand, 2013. "Disability Insurance and Healthcare Reform: Evidence from Massachusetts," Working Papers wp289, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    3. Craig Garthwaite & Tal Gross & Matthew J. Notowidigdo, 2014. "Public Health Insurance, Labor Supply, and Employment Lock," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(2), pages 653-696.
    4. Cathy Bradley & David Neumark & Meryl Motika, 2012. "The effects of health shocks on employment and health insurance: the role of employer-provided health insurance," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 253-267, December.
    5. Brigitte C. Madrian, 1994. "Employment-Based Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Is there Evidence of Job-Lock?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 27-54.
    6. Nicole Maestas & Kathleen J. Mullen & Alexander Strand, 2013. "Does Disability Insurance Receipt Discourage Work? Using Examiner Assignment to Estimate Causal Effects of SSDI Receipt," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(5), pages 1797-1829, August.
    7. Hugo Benítez-Silva & Moshe Buchinsky & Hiu Man Chan & Sofia Cheidvasser & John Rust, 2004. "How large is the bias in self-reported disability?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(6), pages 649-670.
    8. Nicole Maestas & Julie Zissimopoulos, 2010. "How Longer Work Lives Ease the Crunch of Population Aging," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 139-160, Winter.
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