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Exiting from QE

Author

Listed:
  • Fumio Hayashi
  • Junko Koeda

Abstract

We develop a regime-switching SVAR (structural vector autoregression) in which the monetary policy regime, chosen by the central bank responding to economic conditions, is endogenous and observable. There are two regimes, one of which is QE (quantitative easing). The model can incorporate the exit condition for terminating QE. We then apply the model to Japan, a country that has accumulated, by our count, 130 months of QE as of December 2012. Our impulse response and counter-factual analyses yield two findings about QE. First, an increase in reserves raises inflation and output. Second, terminating QE can be expansionary.

Suggested Citation

  • Fumio Hayashi & Junko Koeda, 2014. "Exiting from QE," NBER Working Papers 19938, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19938
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ichiro Fukunaga & Naoya Kato & Junko Koeda, 2015. "Maturity Structure and Supply Factors in Japanese Government Bond Markets," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 33, pages 45-96, November.
    2. Miyamoto, Wataru & Nguyen, Thuy Lan & Sergeyev, Dmitriy, 2016. "Government Spending Multipliers under the Zero Lower Bound: Evidence from Japan," CEPR Discussion Papers 11633, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Henrike Michaelis & Sebastian Watzka, 2014. "Are there Differences in the Effectiveness of Quantitative Easing at the Zero-Lower-Bound in Japan over Time?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4901, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Junko Koeda, 2017. "Bond Supply and Excess Bond Returns in Zero-Lower Bound and Normal Environments: Evidence from Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 68(4), pages 443-457, December.
    5. Kiyotaka Nakashima & Masahiko Shibamoto & Koji Takahashi, 2017. "Identifying Unconventional Monetary Policy Shocks," Discussion Paper Series DP2017-05, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, revised Apr 2017.
    6. Michaelis, Henrike & Watzka, Sebastian, 2017. "Are there differences in the effectiveness of quantitative easing at the zero-lower-bound in Japan over time?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 204-233.
    7. Michaelis, Henrike & Watzka, Sebastian, 2014. "Are there Differences in the Effectiveness of Quantitative Easing in Japan over Time?," Discussion Papers in Economics 21087, University of Munich, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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