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Monetary Policy and Economic Activity in Japan and the United States

Author

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  • R. Anton Braun

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo)

  • Etsuro Shioji

    (Yokohama National University)

Abstract

A cornerstone of monetary policy making is that a looser monetary policy is associated with lower interest rates, higher growth of narrow monetary aggregates, higher output and higher inflation. These responses, which we collectively refer to as the liquidity effect hypothesis, are at odds with some of the leading theoretical models of money. This paper proposes and implements a quasi-Bayesian methodology that allows us to compare the liquidity effect hypothesis with two other hypotheses: the sticky price hypothesis and the inflation tax hypothesis. Our results indicate that there is evidence against the liquidity effect hypothesis in U.S. data, but that a skeptical Bayesian decision maker would still assign most posterior weight it. For Japan, in contrast, even a skeptic would end up favoring the sticky price hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • R. Anton Braun & Etsuro Shioji, 2003. "Monetary Policy and Economic Activity in Japan and the United States," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-251, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  • Handle: RePEc:tky:fseres:2003cf251
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    File URL: http://www.cirje.e.u-tokyo.ac.jp/research/dp/2003/2003cf251.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 1995. "Some Empirical Evidence on the Effects of Shocks to Monetary Policy on Exchange Rates," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 975-1009.
    2. Shioji, Etsuro, 2000. "Identifying Monetary Policy Shocks in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 22-42, March.
    3. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles L., 1999. "Monetary policy shocks: What have we learned and to what end?," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 65-148 Elsevier.
    4. L.J. Christiano & C.J. Gust, 1999. "Taylor Rules in a Limited Participation Model," DNB Staff Reports (discontinued) 33, Netherlands Central Bank.
    5. Ben S. Bernanke & Ilian Mihov, 1998. "Measuring Monetary Policy," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(3), pages 869-902.
    6. Engel, Charles, 1996. "The forward discount anomaly and the risk premium: A survey of recent evidence," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 123-192, June.
    7. Eric M. Leeper & Christopher A. Sims & Tao Zha, 1996. "What Does Monetary Policy Do?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(2), pages 1-78.
    8. Rotemberg, Julio J., 1996. "Prices, output, and hours: An empirical analysis based on a sticky price model," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 505-533, June.
    9. Fuerst, Timothy S., 1992. "Liquidity, loanable funds, and real activity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 3-24, February.
    10. Lucas, Robert E, Jr & Stokey, Nancy L, 1987. "Money and Interest in a Cash-in-Advance Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(3), pages 491-513, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Braun, R. Anton & Shioji, Etsuro, 2006. "Monetary Policy and the Term Structure of Interest Rates in Japan," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 141-162, February.
    2. YANO Koiti, 2009. "Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Models Under a Liquidity Trap and Self-organizing State Space Modeling," ESRI Discussion paper series 206, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    3. Fumio Hayashi & Junko Koeda, 2014. "Exiting from QE," NBER Working Papers 19938, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Koichiro Kamada & Tomohiro Sugo, 2006. "Evaluating Japanese Monetary Policy under the Non-negativity Constraint on Nominal Short-term Interest Rates," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 06-E-17, Bank of Japan.
    5. R. Anton Braun & Etsuro Shioji, 2003. "Aggregate Risk in Japanese Equity Markets," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-250, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

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