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The Demand of Liquid Assets with Uncertain Lumpy Expenditures

  • Fernando Alvarez
  • Francesco Lippi

We consider an inventory model for a liquid asset where the per-period net expenditures have two components: one that is frequent and small and another that is infrequent and large. We give a theoretical characterization of the optimal management of liquid asset as well as of the implied observable statistics. We use our characterization to interpret some aspects of households' currency management in Austria, as well as the management of demand deposits by a large sample of Italian investors.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w18152.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 18152.

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Date of creation: Jun 2012
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Publication status: published as Alvarez, Fernando & Lippi, Francesco, 2013. "The demand of liquid assets with uncertain lumpy expenditures," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(7), pages 753-770.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18152
Note: EFG
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  1. Eppen, Gary D & Fama, Eugene F, 1969. "Cash Balance and Simple Dynamic Portfolio Problems with Proportional Costs," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 10(2), pages 119-33, June.
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  3. Fernando E. Alvarez & Francesco Lippi, 2007. "Financial Innovation and the Transactions Demand for Cash," NBER Working Papers 13416, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Alvarez, Fernando & Guiso, Luigi & Lippi, Francesco, 2010. "Durable consumption and asset management with transaction and observation costs," CEPR Discussion Papers 7702, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Bar-Ilan, A., 1988. "Overdrafts And The Demand For Money," Papers 34-88, Tel Aviv.
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  7. Orazio P. Attanasio & Luigi Guiso & Tullio Jappelli, 2002. "The Demand for Money, Financial Innovation, and the Welfare Cost of Inflation: An Analysis with Household Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 317-351, April.
  8. Jacob A. Frenkel & Boyan Jovanovic, 1978. "On Transactions and Precautionary Demand For Money," NBER Working Papers 0288, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Duffie, Darrell & Sun, Tong-sheng, 1990. "Transactions costs and portfolio choice in a discrete-continuous-time setting," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 35-51, February.
  10. Whitesell, William C, 1989. "The Demand for Currency versus Debitable Accounts: A Note," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 21(2), pages 246-57, May.
  11. Peter Mooslechner & Helmut Stix & Karin Wagner, 2006. "How Are Payments Made in Austria?," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 2, pages 111–134.
  12. Blyth C. Archibald & Edward A. Silver, 1978. "(s, S) Policies Under Continuous Review and Discrete Compound Poisson Demand," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 24(9), pages 899-909, May.
  13. Lippi, Francesco & Secchi, Alessandro, 2009. "Technological change and the households' demand for currency," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 222-230, March.
  14. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1982. "Inflation and Welfare in the Steady State," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(3), pages 561-77, June.
  15. Grossman, Sanford J & Laroque, Guy, 1990. "Asset Pricing and Optimal Portfolio Choice in the Presence of Illiquid Durable Consumption Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(1), pages 25-51, January.
  16. Baccarin, Stefano, 2009. "Optimal impulse control for a multidimensional cash management system with generalized cost functions," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 196(1), pages 198-206, July.
  17. Edwin H. Neave, 1970. "The Stochastic Cash Balance Problem with Fixed Costs for Increases and Decreases," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 16(7), pages 472-490, March.
  18. Bensoussan, Alain & Chutani, Anshuman & Sethi, Suresh, 2009. "Optimal Cash Management Under Uncertainty," MPRA Paper 19896, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  19. Milbourne, Ross, 1983. "Optimal Money Holding under Uncertainty," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 24(3), pages 685-98, October.
  20. Andrew B. Abel & Janice C. Eberly & Stavros Panageas, 2007. "Optimal Inattention to the Stock Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 244-249, May.
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