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Estimating Heterogeneity in the Benefits of Medical Treatment Intensity

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  • William N. Evans
  • Craig L. Garthwaite

Abstract

Federal and state laws passed in the late 1990 increased considerably postpartum stays for newborns. Using all births in California over the 1995-2001 period, 2SLS estimates suggest that for the average newborn impacted by the law, increased treatment intensity had modest and statistically insignificant (p-value>0.05) impacts on readmission probabilities. Allowing the treatment effect to vary by pre-existing conditions or the pre-law propensity score of being discharged early, two objective measures of medical need, demonstrates that the law had large and statistically significant impacts for those with the greatest likelihood of a readmission. These results demonstrate heterogeneity in the returns to greater treatment intensity, and the returns to the average and marginal patient vary considerably.

Suggested Citation

  • William N. Evans & Craig L. Garthwaite, 2009. "Estimating Heterogeneity in the Benefits of Medical Treatment Intensity," NBER Working Papers 15309, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15309
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Seojeong Lee, 2015. "A Consistent Variance Estimator for 2SLS When Instruments Identify Different LATEs," Discussion Papers 2015-01, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    2. N. Meltem Daysal, 2015. "Early-life medical care and human capital accumulation," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 218-218, December.
    3. Dzhamilya Nigmatulina & Charles Becker, 2016. "Is high-tech care in a middle-income country worth it?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 24(4), pages 585-620, October.
    4. repec:eee:jhecon:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:121-138 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. David B. Audretsch, 2015. "Knowledge spillovers and future jobs," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 218-218, December.
    6. Mindy Marks & Kate Choi, 2011. "Baby Boomlets and Baby Health: Hospital Crowdedness, Treatment Intensity, and Infant Health," Working Papers 201440, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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