IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/13536.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Labor Market Status and Transitions during the Pre-Retirement Years: Learning from International Differences

Author

Listed:
  • Arie Kapteyn
  • James P. Smith
  • Arthur van Soest
  • James Banks

Abstract

Many western industrialized countries face strong budgetary pressures due to the aging of the baby boom generations and the general trends toward earlier ages of retirement. We use the American PSID and the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) to explain differences in prevalence and dynamics of self-reported work disability and labor force status. To that end we specify a two-equation dynamic panel data model describing the dynamics of labor force status and self-reported work disability. When we apply the U.S. parameters to the equations for the thirteen European countries we consider, the result is generally that work disability is lower and employment is higher. Furthermore, measures of employment protection across the different countries suggest that increased employment protection reduces reentry into the labor force and hence is a major factor explaining employment differences in the pre-retirement years.

Suggested Citation

  • Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest & James Banks, 2007. "Labor Market Status and Transitions during the Pre-Retirement Years: Learning from International Differences," NBER Working Papers 13536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13536
    Note: AG LS
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w13536.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bound, John & Burkhauser, Richard V., 1999. "Economic analysis of transfer programs targeted on people with disabilities," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 51, pages 3417-3528 Elsevier.
    2. David C. Stapleton & Richard V. Burkhauser (ed.), 2003. "The Decline in Employment of People with Disabilities: A Policy Puzzle," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number depd, November.
    3. James Banks & Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest, 2009. "Work Disability is a Pain in the ****, Especially in England, the Netherlands, and the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Health at Older Ages: The Causes and Consequences of Declining Disability among the Elderly, pages 251-293 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. James Banks & Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur Van Soest, 2004. "International Comparisons of Work Disability," Working Papers WR-155, RAND Corporation.
    5. Dean R. Hyslop, 1999. "State Dependence, Serial Correlation and Heterogeneity in Intertemporal Labor Force Participation of Married Women," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(6), pages 1255-1294, November.
    6. David M. Cutler & David A. Wise, 2009. "Health at Older Ages: The Causes and Consequences of Declining Disability among the Elderly," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number cutl08-1.
    7. James Banks & Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest, 2009. "Work Disability is a Pain in the ****, Especially in England, the Netherlands, and the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Health at Older Ages: The Causes and Consequences of Declining Disability among the Elderly, pages 251-293 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Vella, Francis & Verbeek, Marno, 1999. "Two-step estimation of panel data models with censored endogenous variables and selection bias," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 239-263, June.
    9. Franco Peracchi, 2002. "The European Community Household Panel: A review," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 63-90.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest, 2009. "Work Disability, Work, and Justification Bias in Europe and the U.S," Working Papers wp207, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    2. Arie Kapteyn, 2010. "What can we learn from (and about) global aging?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), pages 191-209.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13536. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.