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Work Disability is a Pain in the *****, Especially in England, The Netherlands, and the United States

Author

Listed:
  • James Banks
  • Arie Kapteyn
  • James P. Smith
  • Arthur van Soest

Abstract

This paper investigates the role of pain in determining self-reported work disability in the US, the UK and The Netherlands. Even if identical questions are asked, cross-country differences in reported work disability remain substantial. In the US and the Netherlands, respondent evaluations of work limitations of hypothetical persons described in pain vignettes are used to identify the extent to which differences in self-reports between countries or socio-economic groups are due to systematic variation in the response scales.

Suggested Citation

  • James Banks & Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest, 2005. "Work Disability is a Pain in the *****, Especially in England, The Netherlands, and the United States," NBER Working Papers 11558, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11558
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Browning & Thomas F. Crossley & Guglielmo Weber, 2003. "Asking consumption questions in general purpose surveys," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(491), pages 540-567, November.
    2. Bound, John & Burkhauser, Richard V., 1999. "Economic analysis of transfer programs targeted on people with disabilities," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 51, pages 3417-3528, Elsevier.
    3. repec:cup:apsrev:v:98:y:2004:i:01:p:191-207_00 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Richard Burkhauser & Mary Daly & Andrew Houtenville & Nigar Nargis, 2002. "Self-reported work-limitation data: What they can and cannot tell US," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(3), pages 541-555, August.
    5. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pc:p:3417-3528 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur Van Soest, 2004. "Self-reported Work Disability in the US and The Netherlands," Working Papers WR-206, RAND Corporation.
    7. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur Van Soest, 2004. "Self-reported Work Disability in the US and The Netherlands," Working Papers 206, RAND Corporation.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Wadsworth, 2013. "Mustn't Grumble: Immigration, Health and Health Service Use in the UK and Germany," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34(1), pages 55-82, March.
    2. Michal Engelman & Bert M. Kestenbaum & Megan L. Zuelsdorff & Neil K. Mehta & Diane S. Lauderdale, 2017. "Work Disability Among Native-born and Foreign-born Americans: On Origins, Health, and Social Safety Nets," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(6), pages 2273-2300, December.
    3. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest & James Banks, 2010. "Labor Market Status and Transitions during the Pre-Retirement Years: Learning from International Differences," NBER Chapters, in: Research Findings in the Economics of Aging, pages 63-92, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Monika Bütler & Eva Deuchert & Michael Lechner & Stefan Staubli & Petra Thiemann, 2015. "Financial work incentives for disability benefit recipients: lessons from a randomised field experiment," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-18, December.
    5. Kapteyn, Arie & Smith, James P. & van Soest, Arthur, 2008. "Dynamics of work disability and pain," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 496-509, March.
    6. Andrew Houtenville & William Erickson & Melissa Bjelland, 2009. "Complex Survey Questions and the Impact of Enumeration Procedures: Census/American Community Survey Disability Questions," Working Papers 09-10, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    7. Ólafsdóttir, Thorhildur & Ásgeirsdóttir, Tinna Laufey & Norton, Edward C., 2020. "Valuing pain using the subjective well-being method," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 37(C).
    8. Kapteyn, Arie & Smith, James P. & van Soest, Arthur, 2008. "Dynamics of work disability and pain," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, pages 496-509.
    9. Jonathan Wadsworth, 2012. "Musn’t Grumble. Immigration, Health and Health Service Use in the UK and Germany," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1221, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access

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