IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/jorssa/v178y2015i4p815-836.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Do household surveys give a coherent view of disability benefit targeting?: a multisurvey latent variable analysis for the older population in Great Britain

Author

Listed:
  • Ruth Hancock
  • Marcello Morciano
  • Stephen Pudney
  • Francesca Zantomio

Abstract

type="main" xml:id="rssa12107-abs-0001"> We compare three major UK surveys, the British Household Panel Survey, Family Resources Survey and the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, in terms of the picture that they give of the relationship between disability and receipt of the attendance allowance benefit. Using the different disability indicators that are available in each survey, we use a structural equation approach involving a latent concept of disability in which probabilities of receiving attendance allowance depend on disability. Despite major differences in design, once sample composition has been standardized through statistical matching, the surveys deliver similar results for the model of disability and receipt of attendance allowance. Provided that surveys offer a sufficiently wide range of disability indicators, the detail of disability measurement appears relatively unimportant.

Suggested Citation

  • Ruth Hancock & Marcello Morciano & Stephen Pudney & Francesca Zantomio, 2015. "Do household surveys give a coherent view of disability benefit targeting?: a multisurvey latent variable analysis for the older population in Great Britain," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 178(4), pages 815-836, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:178:y:2015:i:4:p:815-836
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/rssa.2015.178.issue-4
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stephen Pudney & Monica Hernandez & Ruth Hancock, 2007. "The welfare cost of means-testing: pensioner participation in income support," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 581-598.
    2. Duncan McVicar, 2008. "Why Have Uk Disability Benefit Rolls Grown So Much?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 114-139, February.
    3. Oswald, Andrew J. & Powdthavee, Nattavudh, 2008. "Does happiness adapt? A longitudinal study of disability with implications for economists and judges," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1061-1077, June.
    4. Ruth Hancock & Geraldine Barker, 2005. "The quality of social security benefit data in the British Family Resources Survey: implications for investigating income support take-up by pensioners," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(1), pages 63-82.
    5. Les Mayhew & Martin Karlsson & Ben Rickayzen, 2010. "The Role of Private Finance in Paying for Long Term Care," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(548), pages 478-504, November.
    6. John Bound, 1991. "Self-Reported Versus Objective Measures of Health in Retirement Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 106-138.
    7. Berthoud, Richard & Hancock, Ruth, 2008. "Disability benefits and paying for care," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-40, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    8. Morciano, Marcello & Hancock, Ruth & Pudney, Stephen, 2012. "Disability costs and equivalence scales in the older population," ISER Working Paper Series 2012-09, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    9. Hibbard, Judith H. & Pope, Clyde R., 1983. "Gender roles, illness orientation and use of medical services," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 129-137, January.
    10. Stephen Pudney & Ruth Hancock & Holly Sutherland, 2006. "Simulating the Reform of Means-tested Benefits with Endogenous Take-up and Claim Costs," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(2), pages 135-166, April.
    11. Karlsson, Martin & Mayhew, Les & Plumb, Robert & Rickayzen, Ben, 2006. "Future costs for long-term care: Cost projections for long-term care for older people in the United Kingdom," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 187-213, January.
    12. Zantomio, Francesca, 2013. "Older people's participation in extra-cost disability benefits," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 320-330.
    13. Philippa Clarke & Jacqui Smith, 2011. "Aging in a Cultural Context: Cross-national Differences in Disability and the Moderating Role of Personal Control Among Older Adults in the United States and England," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 66(4), pages 457-467.
    14. Albert Satorra & Peter Bentler, 2001. "A scaled difference chi-square test statistic for moment structure analysis," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 66(4), pages 507-514, December.
    15. Gove, Walter R., 1984. "Gender differences in mental and physical illness: The effects of fixed roles and nurturant roles," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 77-84, January.
    16. Lindeboom, Maarten & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2004. "Cut-point shift and index shift in self-reported health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1083-1099, November.
    17. Pudney, Stephen, 2010. "Disability benefits for older people: how does the UK Attendance Allowance system really work?," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-02, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    18. Groot, Wim, 2000. "Adaptation and scale of reference bias in self-assessments of quality of life," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 403-420, May.
    19. Edwin Leuven & Barbara Sianesi, 2003. "PSMATCH2: Stata module to perform full Mahalanobis and propensity score matching, common support graphing, and covariate imbalance testing," Statistical Software Components S432001, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 01 Feb 2018.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Hancock, Ruth & Morciano, Marcello & Pudney, Stephen, 2013. "Nonparametric estimation of a compensating variation: the cost of disability," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-26, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Holford, Angus, 2015. "Youth employment and academic performance: production functions and policy effects," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-06, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Jäckle, Annette & Pudney, Stephen, 2015. "Survey response behaviour and the dynamics of self-reported health and disability: an experimental analysis," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2015-05, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:178:y:2015:i:4:p:815-836. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/rssssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.