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The Macroeconomic Effects of Losing Autonomous Monetary Policy after the Euro Adoption in Poland

There are many issues associated with the Eurozone accession of Poland. The goal of this paper is to analyse one, but very important aspect, namely - the macroeconomic impact of the loss of autonomous monetary policy. In order to answer this question, we build a two country DSGE model with sticky prices. We begin by evaluating the performance of our model. Next, we investigate how joining the Eurozone will affect the business cycle behaviour of the main macroeconomic variables in Poland. We find that the Euro adoption will have a noticeable impact on the Polish economic fluctuations. In particular, the volatility of domestic output increases and the volatility of inflation decreases. Also, in order to quantify the effect of the Euro adoption, we compute the welfare effect of this monetary policy change. Our findings suggest that the welfare cost is not large.

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Paper provided by National Bank of Poland, Economic Institute in its series National Bank of Poland Working Papers with number 58.

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Length: 46
Date of creation: May 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nbp:nbpmis:58
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  1. Pau Rabanal & Vicente Tuesta, 2013. "Nontradable Goods and the Real Exchange Rate," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 495-535, July.
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  3. Chari, V V & Kehoe, Patrick J & McGrattan, Ellen R, 2002. "Can Sticky Price Models Generate Volatile and Persistent Real Exchange Rates?," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(3), pages 533-63, July.
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  9. Kolasa, Marcin, 2008. "Structural heterogeneity or asymmetric shocks? Poland and the euro area through the lens of a two-country DSGE model," MPRA Paper 8750, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Sam Schulhofer-Wohl, 2008. "Heterogeneous Risk Preferences and the Welfare Cost of Business Cycles," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(4), pages 761-780, October.
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  12. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1982. "Time to Build and Aggregate Fluctuations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(6), pages 1345-70, November.
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  14. Alexandra Lopes, 2006. "The Costs of EMU for Transition Countries," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 149, Society for Computational Economics.
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  16. Erceg, Christopher J. & Henderson, Dale W. & Levin, Andrew T., 2000. "Optimal monetary policy with staggered wage and price contracts," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 281-313, October.
  17. Marvin Goodfriend & Robert King, 1997. "The New Neoclassical Synthesis and the Role of Monetary Policy," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 231-296 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. Juillard, Michel, 1996. "Dynare : a program for the resolution and simulation of dynamic models with forward variables through the use of a relaxation algorithm," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Couverture Orange) 9602, CEPREMAP.
  19. Christine A. McDaniel & Edward J. Balistreri, 2003. "A Discussion on Armington Trade Substitution Elasticities," Computational Economics 0303002, EconWPA.
  20. Lucas, Robert Jr, 1976. "Econometric policy evaluation: A critique," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 19-46, January.
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