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Investment-Specific Technology Shocks and Labor Market Frictions

  • Reinout De Bock


    (Northwestern University, Department of Economics)

This paper studies the implications of technical progress through investment-specific technical change in a business cycle model with search and matching frictions and endogenous job destruction. The interaction between the capital formation needed to reap the benefits of an investment-specific technology shock and gradual labor-market matching, generates hump-shaped, persistent responses in output, vacancies, and unemployment. The endogenous job destruction decision also leads to small but persistent endogenous fluctuations in total factor productivity. Simulations suggest a limited role for investment-specific technology shocks as a source of business cycle fluctuations compared to a standard real business cycle model.

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Paper provided by National Bank of Belgium in its series Working Paper Research with number 108.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nbb:reswpp:200701-01
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