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New evidence, old puzzles: technology shocks and labor market dynamics

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  • Balleer, Almut

Abstract

Can the standard search-and-matching labor market model replicate the business cycle fluctuations of the job finding rate and the unemployment rate? In the model, fluctuations are prominently driven by productivity shocks which are commonly interpreted as technology shocks. I estimate different types of technology shocks from structural VARs and reassess the empirical performance of the standard model based on second moments that are conditional on technology shocks. Most prominently, the model replicates the conditional volatility of job finding and unemployment, so that the Shimer critique does not apply. Instead the model lacks non-technological disturbances to replicate the overall sample volatility. In addition, positive technology shocks lead to a fall in job finding and an increase in unemployment thereby opposing the dynamics in the standard model similar to the hours puzzle in Galí (1999).

Suggested Citation

  • Balleer, Almut, 2009. "New evidence, old puzzles: technology shocks and labor market dynamics," Kiel Working Papers 1500, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkwp:1500
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wesselbaum, Dennis, 2011. "Sector-specific productivity shocks in a matching model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2674-2682.
    2. Lechthaler, Wolfgang & Merkl, Christian & Snower, Dennis J., 2010. "Monetary persistence and the labor market: A new perspective," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 968-983, May.
    3. van Roye, Björn & Wesselbaum, Dennis, 2009. "Capital, endogenous separations, and the business cycle," Kiel Working Papers 1561, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    4. Dennis Wesselbaum, 2015. "Firing costs in a business cycle model with endogenous separations," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 42(3), pages 499-518, August.
    5. Wesselbaum, Dennis, 2009. "Firing costs in a New Keynesian model with endogenous separations," Kiel Working Papers 1550, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    6. Reicher, Christopher Phillip, 2010. "Evaluating the search and matching model with sticky wages," Kiel Working Papers 1674, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor market dynamics; technology shocks; structural VAR; search and matching; business cycle;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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