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Diverging Trends in Aggregate and Firm-Level Volatility in the UK

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  • Miles Parker

Abstract

This paper documents an increase in the volatility of output at the firm level in the United Kingdom, in keeping with recent research for the United States. Evidence at the sectoral level suggests that this may have arisen as a result of increased product market competition. This greater volatility at the firm level has also occurred at a time of greater macroeconomic stability, commonly referred to as the ‘Great Stability’. National accounts data for 31 sectors in the economy show that the fall in aggregate volatility is mostly a result of lower covariance between sectors rather than individual sectors becoming less volatile. This suggests a possible role for structural change in explaining the causes of the ‘Great Stability’.

Suggested Citation

  • Miles Parker, 2006. "Diverging Trends in Aggregate and Firm-Level Volatility in the UK," Discussion Papers 16, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:mpc:wpaper:16
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    File URL: http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/publications/externalmpcpapers/extmpcpaper0016.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Buch Claudia M & Doepke Joerg & Stahn Kerstin, 2009. "Great Moderation at the Firm Level? Unconditional vs. Conditional Output Volatility," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-27, May.
    2. Comin, Diego & Mulani, Sunil, 2009. "A theory of growth and volatility at the aggregate and firm level," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(8), pages 1023-1042, November.
    3. Pengfei Wang & Yi Wen & Zhiwei Xu, 2018. "Financial Development and Long-Run Volatility Trends"," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 28, pages 221-251, April.
    4. Buch, Claudia M. & Döpke, Jörg & Stahn, Kerstin, 2008. "Great moderation at the firm level? Unconditional versus conditional output volatility," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2008,13, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    5. Hyunbae Chun & Jung-Wook Kim & Randall Morck, 2011. "Varying Heterogeneity among U.S. Firms: Facts and Implications," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 1034-1052, August.

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    JEL classification:

    • A00 - General Economics and Teaching - - General - - - General

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