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Dynamic corrective taxes with time-varying salience

Author

Listed:
  • Ben Gilbert

    () (Division of Economics and Business, Colorado School of Mines)

  • Joshua S. Graff Zivin

    () (Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego and NBER)

Abstract

The intermittency of payment for many goods creates a disconnect between paying and consuming such that the marginal price is not always salient when consumption decisions are made. This paper derives optimal dynamic corrective taxes when there are externalities as well as internalities from inattention and persistence in consumption across periods. Our optimal taxes address dynamic inefficiencies that are not captured in static models of inattention. We also characterize a second-best constant tax and the excess burden associated with time-invariant tax rates. We then calibrate the model to U.S. residential electricity consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Ben Gilbert & Joshua S. Graff Zivin, 2018. "Dynamic corrective taxes with time-varying salience," Working Papers 2018-05, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:mns:wpaper:wp201805
    as

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    File URL: http://econbus-papers.mines.edu/working-papers/wp201805.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Salience; Inattention; Optimal Taxes; Energy Demand; Consumption Persistence;

    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • L97 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Utilities: General
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General

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