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The Housing Finance Revolution

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  • Richard K. Green
  • Susan M. Wachter

Abstract

While other countries dismantled their segmented housing finance systems and linked housing finance to capital markets through deregulated depositories, the US linked housing finance to capital markets through depository deregulation and securitization. Elsewhere securitization has not developed. The US provided the underpinnings for its mortgage security infrastructure with the creation of FNMA in 1938 and in order to create liquidity in the mortgage market required the standardization of mortgage documentation and more fundamentally required that home mortgages within securities would be sufficiently homogeneous that they could trade in liquid markets. These developments allowed 22 years of uninterrupted liquidity in the market for conventional conforming mortgages, to be followed by the creation of a subprime mortgage market backed by securities that were illiquid, nonstandardized and marked to model not to market which allowed systemic underpricing of risk. This paper presents the recent history of the linkage of mortgage funding to financial markets in the US and elsewhere and specifically in the US suggests how the housing finance revolution resulted in the "terror" which has brought down global financial markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard K. Green & Susan M. Wachter, 2007. "The Housing Finance Revolution," Working Paper 9095, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
  • Handle: RePEc:luk:wpaper:9095
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karl Case & John Quigley, 2008. "How Housing Booms Unwind: Income Effects, Wealth Effects, and Feedbacks through Financial Markets," European Journal of Housing Policy, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 161-180.
    2. Aron, Janine & Duca, John V. & Muellbauer, John N. & Murata, Keiko & Murphy, Anthony, 2010. "Credit, housing collateral and consumption: evidence from the UK, Japan and the US," Working Papers 1002, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    3. James D. Hamilton, 2007. "Housing and the monetary transmission mechanism: commentary," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 415-422.
    4. Samya Beidas-Strom & Weicheng Lian & Ashwaq Maseeh, 2009. "The Housing Cycle in Emerging Middle Eastern Economies and its Macroeconomic Policy Implications," IMF Working Papers 09/288, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Susan M. Wachter, 1975. "Comment on "Housing Policy, Mortgage Policy, and the Federal Housing Administration"," NBER Chapters,in: Measuring and Managing Federal Financial Risk, pages 125-130 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Heike Joebges & Sebastian Dullien & Alejandro Márquez-Velázquez, 2015. "What causes housing bubbles?," IMK Studies 43-2015, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    7. repec:eee:dyncon:v:81:y:2017:i:c:p:50-64 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Frank Milne, 2008. "Credit Crises, Risk Management Systems and Liquidity Modelling," Working Papers 1, John Deutsch Institute for the Study of Economic Policy.
    9. Agnello, Luca & Schuknecht, Ludger, 2011. "Booms and busts in housing markets: Determinants and implications," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 171-190, September.
    10. Florian Botte & Laurent Cordonnier & Thomas Dallery & Vincent Duwicquet & Jordan Melmies & Franck Van de Velde, 2017. "The cost of capital: between losses and diversion of wealth
      [Le coût du capital : entre pertes et détournement de richesses]
      ," Working Papers hal-01711157, HAL.
    11. Susan M. Wachter, 2010. "The Ongoing Financial Upheaval: Understanding the Sources and Way Out," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 13(2), pages 218-237.
    12. Taesoo Kang & Guonan Ma, 2009. "Credit card lending distress in Korea in 2003," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Household debt: implications for monetary policy and financial stability, volume 46, pages 95-106 Bank for International Settlements.
    13. W. Scott Frame & Lawrence J. White, 2010. "The Industrial Organization of the U.s. Single-Family Residential Mortgage Industry," Working Papers 10-11, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    14. John N. Muellbauer, 2007. "Housing, credit and consumer expenditure," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 267-334.
    15. Sophocles Brissimis & Thomas Vlassopoulos, 2009. "The Interaction between Mortgage Financing and Housing Prices in Greece," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 146-164, August.
    16. Heike Joebges & Sebastian Dullien & Alejandro Márquez-Velázquez, 2015. "What causes housing bubbles? A theoretical and empirical inquiry," Competence Centre on Money, Trade, Finance and Development 1501, Hochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft, Berlin.

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