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Evolving Geographical Specialisation of European Manufacturing Industries

  • Marius BRÜLHART

This paper analyses the geographical specialisation of 32 manufacturing sectors over the 1972-1996 period, based on annual employment and export data for 13 European countries. Specialisation has increased continuously over the sample period in employment terms, while remaining roughly unchanged in export terms. On average, increases in specialisation were stronger prior to the launch of the Single Market than afterwards. The sectors most sensitive to the Single Market, however, showed an acceleration in specialisation after 1986. There is also evidence that low-tech industries are the most strongly specialised, and that centre-periphery gradients across countries are losing importance for industrial location in the EU.

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Paper provided by Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP in its series Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) with number 00.08.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2000
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv, Bd. 137, Heft 2, Juni 2001
Handle: RePEc:lau:crdeep:00.08
Contact details of provider: Postal: Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP, Internef, CH-1015 Lausanne
Phone: ++41 21 692.33.20
Web page: http://www.hec.unil.ch/deep/publications/cahiers/series
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  1. Ellison, G. & Glaeser, E.L., 1994. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," Working papers 94-27, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  2. Donald R. Davis & David E. Weinstein, 1996. "Does Economic Geography Matter for International Specialization?," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1773, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  3. Cowell, F.A., 2000. "Measurement of inequality," Handbook of Income Distribution, in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 87-166 Elsevier.
  4. Lionel Fontagné & Michaël Freudenberg & Nicolas Peridy, 1997. "Trade Patterns Inside the Single Market," Working Papers 1997-07, CEPII research center.
  5. Sergio Nardis & Alessandro Goglio & Marco Malgarini, 1996. "Regional specialization and shocks in Europe: Some evidence from regional data," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 132(2), pages 197-214, September.
  6. Marius BRÜLHART & Federico TRIONFETTI, 1999. "Home-Biased Demand and International Specialisation : A Test of Trade Theories," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 9918, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
  7. Leamer, Edward E. & Levinsohn, James, 1995. "International trade theory: The evidence," Handbook of International Economics, in: G. M. Grossman & K. Rogoff (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 26, pages 1339-1394 Elsevier.
  8. Masahisa Fujita & Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 2001. "The Spatial Economy: Cities, Regions, and International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262561476, June.
  9. Davis, D.R., 1997. "The Home Market, Trade, and Industrial Structure," Papers 597, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
  10. Robert C. Feenstra & James R. Markusen & Andrew K. Rose, 2001. "Using the gravity equation to differentiate among alternative theories of trade," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 430-447, May.
  11. Mary Amiti, 1997. "Specialisation Patterns in Europe," CEP Discussion Papers dp0363, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  12. Redding, Stephen J., 1999. "The Dynamics of International Specialization," CEPR Discussion Papers 2287, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Paul R. Krugman, 1991. "First Nature, Second Nature, and Metropolitan Location," NBER Working Papers 3740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Marius Brülhart & Robert J.R. Elliott, 1998. "Adjustment to the European single market: inferences from intra-industry trade patterns," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 25(3), pages 225-247, September.
  15. Helg, Rodolfo & Manasse, Paolo & Monacelli, Tommaso & Rovelli, Riccardo, 1995. "How much (a)symmetry in Europe? Evidence from industrial sectors," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 1017-1041, May.
  16. Krugman, Paul, 1980. "Scale Economies, Product Differentiation, and the Pattern of Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(5), pages 950-59, December.
  17. Marius Brülhart, 1998. "Trading Places: Industrial Specialization in the European Union," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(3), pages 319-346, 09.
  18. Erik Lundbäck & Johan Torstensson, 1998. "Demand, comparative advantage and economic geography in international trade: Evidence from the OECD," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 134(2), pages 230-249, June.
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