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Does Economic Geography Matter for International Specialization?

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  • Davis, D.R.
  • Weinstein, D.E.

Abstract

There are two principal theories of why countries trade: comparative advantage and increasing returns to scale. Yet there is no empirical work that assesses the relative importance of these two theories in accounting for production structure and trade. We use a framework that nests an increasing returns model of economic geography featuring "home market" effects with that of Heckscher-Ohlin. We employ these trade models to account for the structure of OECD manufacturing produciton.

Suggested Citation

  • Davis, D.R. & Weinstein, D.E., 1997. "Does Economic Geography Matter for International Specialization?," Papers 591, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:harvid:591
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    TRADE ; GEOGRAPHY ; PRODUCTION;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade

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