IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/3740.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

First Nature, Second Nature, and Metropolitan Location

Author

Listed:
  • Paul R. Krugman

Abstract

This paper develops models of spatial equilibrium in which a central metropolis emerges to supply manufactured goods to an agricultural hinterland. The location of the metropolis is not fully determined by the location of resources: as long as it is not too far from the geographical center of the region, the concentration of economic mass at the metropolis makes it the optimal location for manufacturing firms, and is thus self-justifying. The approach in this paper therefore helps explain the role of historical accident and self-fulfilling expectations in metropolitan location.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul R. Krugman, 1991. "First Nature, Second Nature, and Metropolitan Location," NBER Working Papers 3740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3740
    Note: ITI IFM
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w3740.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    2. David, Paul A, 1985. "Clio and the Economics of QWERTY," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 332-337, May.
    3. Henderson, J. Vernon, 1991. "Urban Development: Theory, Fact, and Illusion," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195069020.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Yannis M. Ioannides & Henry G. Overman, 2004. "Spatial evolution of the US urban system," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(2), pages 131-156, April.
    2. John M. Quigley, 1998. "Urban Diversity and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 127-138, Spring.
    3. Marcus Berliant & Yves Zenou, 2014. "Labor Differentiation and Agglomeration in General Equilibrium," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 37(1), pages 36-65, January.
    4. Laura Resmini, 2003. "Economic integration and regional patterns of industry location in transition countries," ERSA conference papers ersa03p399, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Oriana Caldera & Giuseppe Folloni, 2001. "Size, density and costs of network services - the case of the distribution of electricity in Italy," ERSA conference papers ersa01p211, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Xubei Luo & Nong Zhu & Heng-fu Zou, 2014. "China's Lagging Region Development And Targeted Transportation Infrastructure Investments," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(1), pages 157-200, May.
    7. Head, Keith & Mayer, Thierry, 2004. "The empirics of agglomeration and trade," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: J. V. Henderson & J. F. Thisse (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 59, pages 2609-2669 Elsevier.
    8. Catherine Baumont & Cem Ertur & Julie Le Gallo, 2001. "A spatial econometric analysis of geographic spillovers and growth for European regions, 1980-1995," Working Papers hal-01526858, HAL.
    9. BAUMONT, Catherine & ERTUR, Cem & LE GALLO, Julie, 2000. "Geographic Spillover and Growth. A Spatial Econometric Analysis for European Regions," LATEC - Document de travail - Economie (1991-2003) 2000-07, LATEC, Laboratoire d'Analyse et des Techniques EConomiques, CNRS UMR 5118, Université de Bourgogne.
    10. Kurt A. Hafner, 2011. "Trade Liberalization and Technology Diffusion," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(5), pages 963-978, November.
    11. Marius BRÜLHART, 2000. "Evolving Geographical Specialisation of European Manufacturing Industries," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 00.08, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    12. Steven Brakman & Harry Garretsen & Marc Schramm, 2000. "The Empirical Relevance of the New Economic Geography: Testing for a Spatial Wage Structure in Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 395, CESifo Group Munich.
    13. Michael Roos, 2001. "How important is geography for agglomeration?," Discussion Papers in Economics 01_09, University of Dortmund, Department of Economics.
    14. BAUMONT, Catherine & ERTUR, Cem & LE GALLO, Julie, 2000. "Convergence des régions européennes. Une approche par l'économétrie spatiale," LATEC - Document de travail - Economie (1991-2003) 2000-03, LATEC, Laboratoire d'Analyse et des Techniques EConomiques, CNRS UMR 5118, Université de Bourgogne.
    15. Miguel Angel García & Ivan Muñiz, 2005. "The spatial effect of intra-metropolitan agglomeration economies," Working Papers wpdea0513, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    16. Miguel Ángel García & Ivan Muñiz, 2005. "El impacto espacial de las economías de aglomeración y su efecto sobre la estructura urbana.El caso de la industria en Barcelona, 1986-1996," Working Papers wpdea0509, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    17. Oliver Thomas, 1998. "The effectiveness of urban policies facing spatial polarization," ERSA conference papers ersa98p107, European Regional Science Association.
    18. Paul Krugman, 1992. "A Dynamic Spatial Model," NBER Working Papers 4219, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Paul Krugman, 1994. "Fluctuations, Instability, and Agglomeration," NBER Working Papers 4616, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Catherine Armington & Zoltan Acs, 2002. "The Determinants of Regional Variation in New Firm Formation," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 33-45.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3740. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.