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How does context influence players’ behaviour ? Experimental assessment in a 3-player coordination problem

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  • Mathieu Désolé
  • Stefano Farolfi
  • Patrick Rio

Abstract

This paper uses a CGT TU game modified into a coordination experiment to explore the causal effect of context on players’ behaviour. An analytical framework focusing on four attributes representative of the game’s context is proposed and an experimental protocol based on this framework allows testing hypotheses regarding the influence of context on players’ choices. Results show that attributes such as Repetition and Communication seem to have a higher influence than Illustration on players’ behaviour. The peculiar nature of the experimental results in the control group, showing the emergence of a focal point other than the outcome prescribed by the theory, allows discussing the expected “noise” observed in the treatments from a new perspective.

Suggested Citation

  • Mathieu Désolé & Stefano Farolfi & Patrick Rio, 2012. "How does context influence players’ behaviour ? Experimental assessment in a 3-player coordination problem," Working Papers 12-36, LAMETA, Universitiy of Montpellier, revised Dec 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:lam:wpaper:12-36
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    File URL: http://www.lameta.univ-montp1.fr/Documents/DR2012-36.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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