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Comparing Students to Workers: The Effects of Social Framing on Behavior in Distribution Games

Author

Listed:
  • Carpenter, Jeffrey P.

    () (Middlebury College)

  • Burks, Stephen V.

    () (University of Minnesota, Morris)

  • Verhoogen, Eric

    () (Columbia University)

Abstract

To investigate the external validity of Ultimatum and Dictator game behavior we conduct experiments in field settings with naturally occurring variation in "social framing." Our participants are students at Middlebury College, non-traditional students at Kansas City Kansas Community College (KCKCC), and employees at a Kansas City distribution center. Ultimatum game offers are ordered: KCKCC > employee > Middlebury. In the Dictator game employees are more generous than students in either location. This indicates that workers behaved distinctly from both student groups because their allocations do not decrease between games, an effect we attribute to the social framing of the workplace.

Suggested Citation

  • Carpenter, Jeffrey P. & Burks, Stephen V. & Verhoogen, Eric, 2004. "Comparing Students to Workers: The Effects of Social Framing on Behavior in Distribution Games," IZA Discussion Papers 1341, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1341
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fairness; reciprocity; field experiment; Ultimatum game; Dictator game;

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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