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A Tradable Permit System in an Intertemporal Economy: A General Equilibrium Approach

  • Kenichi Akao

    ()

    (School of Social Sciences, Waseda University, and Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University)

  • Shunsuke Managi

    ()

    (Faculty of Business Administration, Yokohama National University)

The creation of an artificial market through a tradable permit system as a remedy against market failure is gaining popularity among analysts and policymakers. We show that in an intertemporal competitive economy, a tradable permit system may not achieve efficiency without setting appropriate permit interest rates (rewards for holding permits), and to find them, we must know in advance the path of efficient permit prices, which is difficult or impossible to obtain. We deal with this problem in two ways. First, we seek a special case in which the permit interest rates are given by a simple rule. Second, we propose a mechanism by which the permit interest rates are generated endogenously. The determinacy of an equilibrium under a tradable permit system is also examined.

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File URL: http://www.kier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/DP/DP658.pdf
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Paper provided by Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research in its series KIER Working Papers with number 658.

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Length: 29pages
Date of creation: Aug 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kyo:wpaper:658
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  1. Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe & Jess Benhabib & Martin Uribe, 2001. "Monetary Policy and Multiple Equilibria," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 167-186, March.
  2. Paul Leiby & Jonathan Rubin, 2001. "Intertemporal Permit Trading for the Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 19(3), pages 229-256, July.
  3. Stokey, Nancy L, 1998. "Are There Limits to Growth?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(1), pages 1-31, February.
  4. Curtis Carlson & Dallas Burtraw & Maureen Cropper & Karen L. Palmer, 2000. "Sulfur Dioxide Control by Electric Utilities: What Are the Gains from Trade?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(6), pages 1292-1326, December.
  5. Ken-Ichi Akao & Shunsuke Managi, 2013. "A Tradable Permit System in an Intertemporal Economy," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(3), pages 309-336, July.
  6. Pizer, William & Newell, Richard & Zhang, Jiangfeng, 2003. "Managing Permit Markets to Stabilize Prices," Discussion Papers dp-03-34, Resources For the Future.
  7. Pierre-André Jouvet & Philippe Michel & Gilles Rotillon, 2004. "Optimal growth with pollution : how to use pollution permits ?," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques v04012, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  8. Richard Layard & Guy Mayraz & Stephen J Nickell, 2007. "The marginal utility of income," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19745, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  9. Montgomery, W. David, 1972. "Markets in licenses and efficient pollution control programs," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 395-418, December.
  10. Kling, Catherine & Rubin, Jonathan, 1997. "Bankable permits for the control of environmental pollution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 101-115, April.
  11. Cropper, Maureen L & Oates, Wallace E, 1992. "Environmental Economics: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 675-740, June.
  12. Gren, Ing-Marie & Folmer, Henk, 2003. "Cooperation with respect to cleaning of an international water body with stochastic environmental damage: the case of the Baltic Sea," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 33-42, November.
  13. Woodford, Michael, 1994. "Monetary Policy and Price Level Determinacy in a Cash-in-Advance Economy," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 345-80.
  14. Cronshaw, Mark B & Brown-Kruse, Jamie, 1996. "Regulated Firms in Pollution Permit Markets with Banking," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 179-89, March.
  15. Itaya, Jun-ichi, 2008. "Can environmental taxation stimulate growth? The role of indeterminacy in endogenous growth models with environmental externalities," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 1156-1180, April.
  16. Yates, Andrew J. & Cronshaw, Mark B., 2001. "Pollution Permit Markets with Intertemporal Trading and Asymmetric Information," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 104-118, July.
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