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Rent Control and Unemployment Duration

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Svarer

    (Department of Economics, University of Aarhus)

  • Michael Rosholm

    (Department of Economics, University of Aarhus)

  • Jacob Roland Munch

    (Danish Economic Council)

Abstract

In this paper we investigate whether rent control affects the functioning of th labour market. Particularly, we focus on the effect of rent control on the length of individual unemployment duration. Theoretically, the effect is ambigious. Rent control reduces housing mobility and could very well spill-over to mobility in the labour market. On the other hand, to maintain their rent control benefits unemployed individuals are presumably less demanding when accepting a job in the local labour market. Based on a rich Danish data set we investigate the empirical contents of the issue, and find results that are in clear accordance with the theoretical predictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Svarer & Michael Rosholm & Jacob Roland Munch, 2003. "Rent Control and Unemployment Duration," CAM Working Papers 2003-07, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuieca:2003_07
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/cam/wp0910/wp0203/2003-07.pdf/
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Decressin, Jorg & Fatas, Antonio, 1995. "Regional labor market dynamics in Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1627-1655, December.
    2. Hardman, Anna M & Ioannides, Yannis M, 1999. " Residential Mobility and the Housing Market in a Two-Sector Neoclassical Growth Model," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 101(2), pages 315-335, June.
    3. Hans Lind, 2001. "Rent Regulation: A Conceptual And Comparative Analysis," European Journal of Housing Policy, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 41-57, April.
    4. Edward L. Glaeser & Erzo F. P. Luttmer, 2003. "The Misallocation of Housing Under Rent Control," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1027-1046, September.
    5. Richard Arnott, 1997. "Rent Control," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 391., Boston College Department of Economics.
    6. Peter Jensen & Michael Svarer, 2003. "Short- and long-term unemployment: How do temporary layoffs affect this distinction?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 23-44, January.
    7. Paul Gregg & Stephen Machin & Alan Manning, 2004. "Mobility and Joblessness," NBER Chapters,in: Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, pages 371-410 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Gyourko, Joseph & Linneman, Peter, 1990. "Rent controls and rental housing quality: A note on the effects of New York City's old controls," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 398-409, May.
    9. Arnott, Richard & Igarashi, Masahiro, 2000. "Rent control, mismatch costs and search efficiency," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 249-288, May.
    10. Alston, Richard M & Kearl, J R & Vaughan, Michael B, 1992. "Is There a Consensus among Economists in the 1990's?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 203-209, May.
    11. Munch, Jakob Roland & Svarer, Michael, 2002. "Rent control and tenancy duration," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 542-560, November.
    12. Hans Lind, 2001. "Rent Regulation: A Conceptual And Comparative Analysis," International Journal of Housing Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 41-57.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Rosholm & Michael Svarer & Bo Hammer, 2004. "A Danish Profiling System," Economics Working Papers 2004-13, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    2. Arnott, Richard & Shevyakhova, Elizaveta, 2014. "Tenancy rent control and credible commitment in maintenance," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 72-85.
    3. Munch, Jakob Roland & Rosholm, Michael & Svarer, Michael, 2008. "Home ownership, job duration, and wages," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 130-145, January.
    4. Yuval Kantor & Peter Nijkamp & Jan Rouwendal, 2013. "Homeownership, Unemployment and Commuting Distances," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-144/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Claire Dujardin & Florence Goffette-Nagot, 2009. "Does public housing occupancy increase unemployment?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(6), pages 823-851, November.
    6. Shing-Yi Wang, 2011. "State Misallocation and Housing Prices: Theory and Evidence from China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 2081-2107, August.
    7. Christian A. L. Hilber & Teemu Lyytikäinen, 2012. "The Effect of the UK Stamp Duty Land Tax on Household Mobility," SERC Discussion Papers 0115, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    8. Essi Eerola & Tuukka Saarimaa, 2017. "Delivering Affordable Housing and Neighborhood Quality: A Comparison of Place- and Tenant-Based Programs," CESifo Working Paper Series 6674, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Larsen, Morten Marott & Pilegaard, Ninette & Ommeren, Jos Van, 2008. "Congestion and residential moving behaviour," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 378-387, July.
    10. Duebel, Hans-Joachim & Brzeski, W. Jan & Hamilton, Ellen, 2006. "Rental choice and housing policy realignment in transition : post-privatization challenges in the Europe and Central Asia region," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3884, The World Bank.
    11. Mark A. C. Kattenberg & Wolter H. J. Hassink, 2017. "Who Moves Out of Social Housing? The Effect of Rent Control on Housing Tenure Choice," De Economist, Springer, vol. 165(1), pages 43-66, March.
    12. Stephen Whelan, 2009. "The Dynamics of Public Housing Tenure in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(2), pages 155-176.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    rent control; unemployment duration; search model;

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • D45 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Rationing; Licensing
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation

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