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Impacts of Agricultural Extension on Crop Productivity, Poverty and Vulnerability: Evidence from Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Md. Faruq Hasan

    (Department of Agricultural Extension, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Bangladesh)

  • Katsushi S. Imai

    (Economics, School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester (UK) and RIEB, Kobe University (Japan))

  • Takahiro Sato

    (Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration (RIEB), Kobe University, Japan)

Abstract

The present study examines whether agricultural extension improves household crop productivity, reduces poverty as well as vulnerability in rural Uganda drawing upon Uganda National Panel Survey data in 2009-10. We first estimate household crop productivity using stochastic frontier analysis that can allow for stochastic shocks in the production function. Then, the effect of different types of agricultural extension programmes on the crop productivity is estimated by treatment effects model which controls for the sample selection associated with household participation in agricultural extension. In this model, the distance to agricultural extension service centre is used as an instrument for participation in agricultural extension. It is found that household crop productivity was significantly raised by household participation in all types of agricultural extension programs except NGO programs, while household expenditure per capita was also significantly increased by participation in most cases. This is consistent with the central objectives of agricultural extension to improve productivity and reduce poverty. Further evidence is provided on the role of extension in reducing vulnerability as expected poverty associated with extension programs of NAADS, large farmers and other types of extension service providers.

Suggested Citation

  • Md. Faruq Hasan & Katsushi S. Imai & Takahiro Sato, 2012. "Impacts of Agricultural Extension on Crop Productivity, Poverty and Vulnerability: Evidence from Uganda," Discussion Paper Series DP2012-34, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, revised Feb 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2012-34
    as

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    File URL: http://www.rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp/academic/ra/dp/English/DP2012-34.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, 2012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Katsushi S. Imai & Md. Faruq Hasan & Eleonora Porreca, 2015. "Do Agricultural Extension Programmes Reduce Poverty and Vulnerability? Farm Size, Agricultural Productivity and Poverty in Uganda," Discussion Paper Series DP2015-06, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    2. Katsushi S. Imai & Bilal Maleb, 2015. "Rural and Urban Poverty Estimates for Developing Countries: Methodologies," Discussion Paper Series DP2015-07, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural Extension; Poverty; Vulnerability; Treatment Effects Model; Uganda;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • N57 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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