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Rural and Urban Poverty Estimates for Developing Countries: Methodologies

Author

Listed:
  • Katsushi S. Imai

    (School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester (UK) and RIEB, Kobe University (Japan))

  • Bilal Maleb

    (Economics, School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester, UK)

Abstract

This paper is to set out the backgrounds for the construction of new rural and urban poverty and inequality estimates using the World Bank Living Standard Measurement Survey (LSMS) data of developing countries with focus on methodological details as well as on their advantages or disadvantages. First, we have reviewed recent regional estimates based on the US$1.25 per day poverty line as well as those based on Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) for both rural and urban areas. It has been found that the level of poverty is much higher in rural areas than in urban areas across different regions regardless of the definitions of poverty. Second, we have summarised estimates of poverty and inequality for Tanzania and Uganda based on recent panel data constructed by LSMS.

Suggested Citation

  • Katsushi S. Imai & Bilal Maleb, 2015. "Rural and Urban Poverty Estimates for Developing Countries: Methodologies," Discussion Paper Series DP2015-07, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2015-07
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    File URL: http://www.rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp/academic/ra/dp/English/DP2015-07.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Christiaensen, Luc & Todo, Yasuyuki, 2014. "Poverty Reduction During the Rural–Urban Transformation – The Role of the Missing Middle," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 43-58.
    6. Katsushi S. Imai & Raghav Gaiha, 2014. "Dynamic and Long-term Linkages among Growth, Inequality and Poverty in Developing Countries," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1410, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    7. Katsushi S. Imai & Gordon Abekah-Nkrumah & Purnima Purohit, 2014. "Is Rural Contribution to Aggregate Poverty Reduction Substantial? New Evidence," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 20814, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    8. Meeusen, Wim & van den Broeck, Julien, 1977. "Efficiency Estimation from Cobb-Douglas Production Functions with Composed Error," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 18(2), pages 435-444, June.
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    11. Dasgupta, Partha, 1997. "Nutritional status, the capacity for work, and poverty traps," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 5-37, March.
    12. Md. Faruq Hasan & Katsushi S. Imai & Takahiro Sato, 2012. "Impacts of Agricultural Extension on Crop Productivity, Poverty and Vulnerability: Evidence from Uganda," Discussion Paper Series DP2012-34, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, revised Feb 2013.
    13. Collier, Paul & Dercon, Stefan, 2014. "African Agriculture in 50Years: Smallholders in a Rapidly Changing World?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 92-101.
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    Cited by:

    1. Katsushi S. Imai & Md. Faruq Hasan & Eleonora Porreca, 2015. "Do Agricultural Extension Programmes Reduce Poverty and Vulnerability? Farm Size, Agricultural Productivity and Poverty in Uganda," Discussion Paper Series DP2015-06, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.

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