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Social Norms on Working Hours, Work-Life Balance, and Fertility Choice

  • Kohei Daido

    ()

    (School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University)

  • Ken Tabata

    ()

    (School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University)

This paper studies the role played by the social norms of working hours in a household labor- leisure and fertility decision model. We suppose that social norms enforce workers not to deviate from the ideal level of working hours, which depends on past and current observations of working hours in workplaces. We show that the social norms lead to multiple equilibria: one with long working hours and a low fertility rate and another with short working hours and a high fertility rate. Our results may help to explain the long working hours and low fertility rate that are observed in Japan.

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Paper provided by School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University in its series Discussion Paper Series with number 108.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2013
Date of revision: Sep 2013
Handle: RePEc:kgu:wpaper:108
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  1. Edward C. Prescott, 2003. "Why do Americans work so much more than Europeans?," Staff Report 321, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  2. Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, 2002. "Does the Mortality Decline Promote Economic Growth?," Macroeconomics 0212008, EconWPA.
  3. Makoto Hirazawa & Akira Yakita, 2009. "Fertility, child care outside the home, and pay-as-you-go social security," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 565-583, July.
  4. Kuroda, Sachiko, 2010. "Do Japanese Work Shorter Hours than before? Measuring trends in market work and leisure using 1976-2006 Japanese time-use survey," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 481-502, December.
  5. Palivos, Theodore, 2001. "Social norms, fertility and economic development," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(12), pages 1919-1934, December.
  6. Matthias Doepke, 2001. "Accounting for Fertility Decline During the Transition to Growth," UCLA Economics Working Papers 804, UCLA Department of Economics.
  7. Munshi, Kaivan & Myaux, Jacques, 2006. "Social norms and the fertility transition," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 1-38, June.
  8. Kuroda, Sachiko & Yamamoto, Isamu, 2011. "What determines work hours?: who you work with or where you work?," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper 514, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  9. Alessandro Balestrino & Alessandro Cigno & Anna Pettini, 2002. "Endogenous Fertility and the Design of Family Taxation," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 175-193, March.
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