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Changes in Population Movements and Employment after the Great East Japan Earthquake

Author

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  • Fang HE

    (Panel Data Research Center at Keio University)

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake on population movements and employment. To capture changes over time, we use government statistics and household panel data, which contain detailed demographic and economic information from before and after the earthquake. Our results show that after the earthquake, the three disaster-stricken prefectures experienced population loss through emigration; this caused labor market shortages. Negative impacts on individual employment status were mainly observed immediately after the earthquake. Individuals with lower incomes were found to be at higher risk of losing their jobs, whereas young individuals had higher probabilities of being newly hired.

Suggested Citation

  • Fang HE, 2015. "Changes in Population Movements and Employment after the Great East Japan Earthquake," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2015-005, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
  • Handle: RePEc:keo:dpaper:2015-005
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    File URL: http://ies.keio.ac.jp/upload/pdf/en/DP2015-005.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Leah Platt Boustan & Matthew E. Kahn & Paul W. Rhode, 2012. "Moving to Higher Ground: Migration Response to Natural Disasters in the Early Twentieth Century," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 238-244, May.
    2. Mark Skidmore & Hideki Toya, 2002. "Do Natural Disasters Promote Long-Run Growth?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 40(4), pages 664-687, October.
    3. Ariel R. Belasen & Solomon W. Polachek, 2009. "How Disasters Affect Local Labor Markets: The Effects of Hurricanes in Florida," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(1).
    4. Andrea Leiter & Harald Oberhofer & Paul Raschky, 2009. "Creative Disasters? Flooding Effects on Capital, Labour and Productivity Within European Firms," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(3), pages 333-350, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Population movement; Employment; Japan; Post-disaster recovery;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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