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Profit shifting by EU banks: evidence from country-by-country reporting

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Abstract

We investigate profit shifting by the largest and systemically relevant European multinational banks using new data made available through country-by-country reporting for the financial years 2014-2016. We capture tax incentives for income shifting using a multilateral tax differential between the local tax rate and the tax rates in the other countries where the bank has operations. We find that profits - particularly those recorded in tax havens - are negatively affected by corporate taxation. Moreover, the bulk of income shifting seems to take place among subsidiaries, as foreign-to-foreign tax differences matter significantly more that home-to-foreign differentials. Simulation results suggest that the amount of shifted profits in tax havens is about 38% of true profits. The ratio between shifted and true profits drops to about 7% when selected non havens are considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Fatica, Serena & Wildmer, Gregori, 2018. "Profit shifting by EU banks: evidence from country-by-country reporting," Working Papers 2018-04, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Ispra site).
  • Handle: RePEc:jrs:wpaper:201804
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    Cited by:

    1. Galstyan, Vahagn & Maqui, Eduardo & McQuade, Peter, 2019. "International Debt and Special Purpose Entities: Evidence from Ireland," Research Technical Papers 13/RT/19, Central Bank of Ireland.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    banks; tax havens; regulation; tax avoidance; transparency;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • H87 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - International Fiscal Issues; International Public Goods

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