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How do Incentives affect Creativity?

  • Katharina Eckartz

    ()

    (Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, International Max Planck Research School on Adapting Behavior in a Fundamentally Uncertain World)

  • Oliver Kirchkamp

    ()

    (Chair for Empirical and Experimental Economics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena)

  • Daniel Schunk

    ()

    (University of Mainz)

We compare performance in a word based creativity task under three incentive schemes: a flat fee, a linear payment and a tournament. Furthermore, we also compare performance under two control tasks (Raven's advanced progressive matrices or a number-adding task) with the same treatments. In all tasks we find that incentives seem to have very small effects and that differences in performance are predominantly related to individual skills.

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Paper provided by Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics in its series Jena Economic Research Papers with number 2012-068.

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Date of creation: 13 Dec 2012
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Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2012-068
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