IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/jic/wpaper/83.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Aid Fragmentation and Effectiveness for Infant and Child Mortality and Primary School Completion

Author

Listed:
  • Furukawa, Mitsuaki

Abstract

This paper examined empirically the overall effect of the project aid fragmentation in the health and education sectors. It focused on the infant and child mortality rate for the health sector and the primary school completion rate for the education sector because they are flagged as important indicators of the MDGs. The research questions in this paper are whether the mitigation of project aid fragmentation leads to the improvement of the two indicators and whether the result differs between health and education. The major findings are the followings: Even if project aid fragmentation is reduced, there may be no reduction in infant and child mortality rates. On the contrary, The rate will be the worst at the mid-range of fragmentation. On the other hand, the reduction of aid fragmentation in countries which receive relatively high external aid will positively impact the primary school completion rate. These findings lead to the conclusion that the effectiveness of aid-fragmentation reduction differs from one sector to another and depends on the degree of aid dependence.

Suggested Citation

  • Furukawa, Mitsuaki, 2014. "Aid Fragmentation and Effectiveness for Infant and Child Mortality and Primary School Completion," Working Papers 83, JICA Research Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:jic:wpaper:83
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10685/146
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://jicari.repo.nii.ac.jp/?action=repository_uri&item_id=735&file_id=9&file_no=1
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
    2. Holtz-Eakin, Douglas & Newey, Whitney & Rosen, Harvey S, 1989. "The Revenues-Expenditures Nexus: Evidence from Local Government Data," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(2), pages 415-429, May.
    3. Djankov, Simeon & Montalvo, Jose G. & Reynal-Querol, Marta, 2009. "Aid with multiple personalities," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 217-229, June.
    4. Knack, Stephen & Rahman, Aminur, 2007. "Donor fragmentation and bureaucratic quality in aid recipients," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 176-197, May.
    5. Maurice J. G. Bun & Frank Windmeijer, 2010. "The weak instrument problem of the system GMM estimator in dynamic panel data models," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 13(1), pages 95-126, February.
    6. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    7. Frot, Emmanuel & Santiso, Javier, 2009. "Crushed Aid: Fragmentation in Sectoral Aid," SITE Working Paper Series 6, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics.
    8. Knack, Stephen & Eubank, Nicholas, 2009. "Aid and trust in country systems," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5005, The World Bank.
    9. David Dollar & Craig Burnside, 2000. "Aid, Policies, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 847-868, September.
    10. Hansen, Henrik & Tarp, Finn, 2001. "Aid and growth regressions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 547-570, April.
    11. David Fielding & George Mavrotas, 2008. "Aid Volatility and Donor-Recipient Characteristics in 'Difficult Partnership Countries'," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(299), pages 481-494, August.
    12. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-35 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. repec:oup:wbecrv:v:31:y:2017:i:3:p:708-729. is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Hudson, John, 2015. "Consequences of Aid Volatility for Macroeconomic Management and Aid Effectiveness," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 62-74.
    15. Kurt Annen & Luc Moers, 2017. "Donor Competition for Aid Impact, and Aid Fragmentation," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(3), pages 708-729.
    16. Wei Wang & Lungā€Fei Lee, 2013. "Estimation of spatial autoregressive models with randomly missing data in the dependent variable," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 16(1), pages 73-102, February.
    17. Neanidis, Kyriakos C. & Varvarigos, Dimitrios, 2009. "The allocation of volatile aid and economic growth: Theory and evidence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 447-462, December.
    18. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    19. Morss, Elliott R., 1984. "Institutional destruction resulting from donor and project proliferation in Sub-Saharan African countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 465-470, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tony Addison & Finn Tarp, 2015. "Lessons for Japanese foreign aid from research on aid's impact," WIDER Working Paper Series 056, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Stefan Leiderer, 2015. "Donor Coordination for Effective Government Policies?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(8), pages 1422-1445, November.
    3. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2015-58 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:unu:wpaper:wp201558 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    aid effectiveness ; aid fragmentation ; health sector ; education sector ; MDGs;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:jic:wpaper:83. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Japan International Cooperation Agency Library). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/jicgvjp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.