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Financial Sector Reform After the Crisis: Has Anything Happened?

  • Alexander Schaefer

    ()

    (hair of International Macroeconomics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Germany)

  • Isabel Schnabel

    ()

    (Chair of Financial Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Germany)

  • Beatrice Weder di Mauro

    ()

    (Chair of International Macroeconomics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Germany)

We analyze the reaction of stock returns and CDS spreads of banks from Europe and the United States to four major regulatory reforms in the aftermath of the subprime crisis, employing an event study analysis. In contrast to the public perception that nothing has happened, we find that financial markets indeed reacted to the structural reforms enacted at the national level. All reforms succeeded in reducing bail-out expectations, especially for systemic banks. However, banks’ profitability was also affected, showing up in lower equity returns. The strongest effects were found for the Dodd-Frank Act (especially the Volcker rule), whereas market reactions to the German restructuring law were small.

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File URL: http://www.macro.economics.uni-mainz.de/RePEc/pdf/Discussion_Paper_1304.pdf
File Function: First version, 2013
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Paper provided by Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz in its series Working Papers with number 1304.

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Length: 46 pages
Date of creation: 24 May 2013
Date of revision: 24 May 2013
Handle: RePEc:jgu:wpaper:1304
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