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Bail-in Expectations for European Banks: Actions Speak Louder than Words

Author

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  • Schäfer, Alexander
  • Schnabel, Isabel
  • Weder di Mauro, Beatrice

Abstract

The declared intention of policy makers is that future bank restructuring should be conducted through bail-in rather than bail-out. Over the past years there have been a few cases of European banks being restructured where creditors were bailed in. This paper exploits these cases to investigate the market reactions of stock prices and credit default swap (CDS) spreads of European banks in order to gauge the extent to which it is expected that bail-in will indeed become the new regime. We find evidence of increased CDS spreads and falling stock prices most notably after the bail-in in Cyprus. However, bail-in expectations appear to depend on the sovereign’s fiscal strength, i.e., reactions are stronger for banks in countries with limited fiscal space for bail-out. Moreover, actual bail-ins lead to stronger market reactions than the legal implementation of bank resolution regimes, supporting the saying that actions speak louder than words.

Suggested Citation

  • Schäfer, Alexander & Schnabel, Isabel & Weder di Mauro, Beatrice, 2016. "Bail-in Expectations for European Banks: Actions Speak Louder than Words," CEPR Discussion Papers 11061, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:11061
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lammertjan Dam & Michael Koetter, 2012. "Bank Bailouts and Moral Hazard: Evidence from Germany," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 25(8), pages 2343-2380.
    2. Dewatripont, Mathias, 2014. "European banking: Bailout, bail-in and state aid control," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 37-43.
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    8. Völz, Manja & Wedow, Michael, 2011. "Market discipline and too-big-to-fail in the CDS market: Does banks' size reduce market discipline?," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 195-210, March.
    9. Ongena, Steven & Smith, David C. & Michalsen, Dag, 2003. "Firms and their distressed banks: lessons from the Norwegian banking crisis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 81-112, January.
    10. Hakenes, Hendrik & Schnabel, Isabel, 2010. "Banks without parachutes: Competitive effects of government bail-out policies," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 156-168, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kok, Christoffer & Hałaj, Grzegorz & Hüser, Anne-Caroline & Perales, Cristian & van der Kraaij, Anton, 2017. "The systemic implications of bail-in: a multi-layered network approach," Working Paper Series 2010, European Central Bank.
    2. Faia, Ester & Weder, Beatrice, 2016. "Cross-Border Resolution of Global Banks: Bail in under Single Point of Entry versus Multiple Points of Entry," CEPR Discussion Papers 11171, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Beck, Thorsten & Da-Rocha-Lopes, Samuel & Silva, Andre, 2017. "Sharing the Pain? Credit Supply and Real Effects of Bank Bail-ins," CEPR Discussion Papers 12058, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Lorenzo Pandolfi, 2018. "Bail-in vs. Bailout: a False Dilemma?," CSEF Working Papers 499, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    5. repec:onb:oenbfs:y:2017:i:33:b:4 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:jebusi:v:95:y:2018:i:c:p:141-163 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bail-in; bank restructuring; creditor participation; event study; Single Resolution Mechanism;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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