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The Perennial Challenge to Counter Too-Big-To-Fail in Banking: Empirical Evidence from the New International Regulation Dealing with Global Systemically Important Banks

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  • Sebastian C. MOENNINGHOFF

    (WHU - Otto Beisheim School of Management)

  • Steven ONGENA

    (University of Zurich)

  • Axel WIEANDT

    (WHU - Otto Beisheim School of Management)

Abstract

This paper provides evidence on how the new international regulation on Global Systemically Important Banks (G-SIBs) impacts the market value of large banks. We analyze the stock price reactions for the 300 largest banks from 52 countries across 12 relevant regulatory announcement and designation events. We observe that the new regulation negatively affects the value of the newly regulated banks, yet that the official designation of banks as “globally systemically important” itself has a partly offsetting positive impact. A cross-sectional analysis of the valuation effects with respect to, for example, government ownership of banks supports the view that the positive reaction to these designations can be attributed to a Too-Big-to-Fail (TBTF) perception by investors. The fact that these valuation effects emerge from a regulation specifically designed to reduce the costs and risks of Too-Big-to-Fail demonstrates the inherently paradoxical nature of the new regulation. These results further suggest that even though the individual components of the regulation have been effective, revealing the identities of G-SIBs eliminated ambiguity about the presence of government guarantees, and thereby may have run counter to the regulators’ intent to contain the effects of TBTF.

Suggested Citation

  • Sebastian C. MOENNINGHOFF & Steven ONGENA & Axel WIEANDT, 2014. "The Perennial Challenge to Counter Too-Big-To-Fail in Banking: Empirical Evidence from the New International Regulation Dealing with Global Systemically Important Banks," Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper Series 14-33, Swiss Finance Institute, revised Jan 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:chf:rpseri:rp1433
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    Cited by:

    1. Simoens, Mathieu & Vennet, Rudi Vander, 2021. "Bank performance in Europe and the US: A divergence in market-to-book ratios," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 40(C).
    2. Vogel, Ursula, 2020. "O-SII designation and deposit funding costs," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 192(C).
    3. Liu, Frank Hong & Norden, Lars & Spargoli, Fabrizio, 2020. "Does uniqueness in banking matter?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).
    4. Nicolas Soenen & Rudi Vander Vennet, 2020. "Drivers of Bank Default Risk: Bank Business Models, the Sovereign and Monetary Policy," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 20/997, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    5. Gündüz, Yalin, 2020. "The market impact of systemic risk capital surcharges," Discussion Papers 09/2020, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    6. Schäfer, Alexander, 2016. "A SIFI Badge for Banks in Europe: Reduction in Bail-Out Expectations or Monumental Heritage Protection?," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145754, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Bańbuła, Piotr & Iwanicz-Drozdowska, Małgorzata, 2016. "The systemic importance of banks – name and shame seems to work," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 297-301.
    8. Mohanty, Sunil K. & Akhigbe, Aigbe & Basheikh, Abdulrahman & Khan, Haroon ur Rashid, 2018. "The Dodd-Frank Act and Basel III: Market-based risk implications for global systemically important banks (G-SIBs)," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 47, pages 91-109.
    9. Belén Díaz Díaz & Rebeca García-Ramos & Myriam García-Olalla, 2017. "Shareholder wealth responses to European legislation on bank executive compensation," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 271-291, July.
    10. Amira Annabi & Alicja K. Reuben, 2017. "Banks’ asset and liability valuation in the new regulatory environment: a game theory perspective," Journal of Banking Regulation, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 18(4), pages 302-309, November.
    11. Elayan, Fayez A. & Aktas, Rafet & Brown, Kareen & Pacharn, Parunchana, 2018. "The impact of the Volcker rule on targeted banks, systemic risk, liquidity, and financial reporting quality," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 69-89.
    12. Bellia, Mario & Heynderickx, Wouter & Maccaferri, Sara & Schich, Sebastian, 2020. "Do CDS markets care about the G-SIB status?," Working Papers 2020-02, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Ispra site).
    13. Schäfer, Alexander & Schnabel, Isabel & Weder di Mauro, Beatrice, 2016. "Bail-in Expectations for European Banks: Actions Speak Louder than Words," CEPR Discussion Papers 11061, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Schäfer, Alexander & Schnabel, Isabel & Weder di Mauro, Beatrice, 2016. "Bail-in Expectations for European Banks: Actions Speak Louder than Words," CEPR Discussion Papers 11061, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    15. Andrieș, Alin Marius & Nistor, Simona & Ongena, Steven & Sprincean, Nicu, 2020. "On Becoming an O-SII (“Other Systemically Important Institution”)," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 111(C).
    16. Patel, Pankaj C. & Struckell, Elisabeth M. & Ojha, Divesh, 2020. "Calorie labeling law and fast food chain performance: The value of capital responsiveness under sales volatility," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 346-356.
    17. Schäfer, Alexander & Schnabel, Isabel & Weder di Mauro, Beatrice, 2016. "Bail-in expectations for European banks: Actions speak louder than words," ESRB Working Paper Series 7, European Systemic Risk Board.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    TBTF; Too Big to Fail; G-SIB; Global Systemically Important Bank; Bank Regulation; Unintended Consequences;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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