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Business Cycles of Non-mono-cultural Developing Economies: The Case of ASEAN Countries

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  • Kodama, Masahiro

Abstract

Based on analyses of actual data, we reveal that many Asian developing economies own economic structural features of "non-mono-cultural economy" and the "large primary good sector", which have not been discussed in developing economies RBC literature. We also examine the input-output tables to develop a model reflecting actual developing economies' structures. Referring to the analyses, we construct RBC models of ASEAN countries. Based on the model, we find that approximately half of GDP volatility is attributable to domestic productivity shocks, and the remaining half is attributable to price shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Kodama, Masahiro, 2006. "Business Cycles of Non-mono-cultural Developing Economies: The Case of ASEAN Countries," IDE Discussion Papers 52, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper52
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    File URL: https://ir.ide.go.jp/?action=repository_action_common_download&item_id=38114&item_no=1&attribute_id=22&file_no=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Samuel Bates & Cheikh Tidiane Ndiaye, 2014. "Economic Growth from a Structural Unobserved Component Modeling: The Case of Senegal," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 951-965.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Business Cycles; Developing Economies; Economic development; Input-output tables; Asia; Southeast Asia; Thailand; Malaysia; Indonesia; Philippines; 景気; 経済開発; 産業連関表; アジア; 東南アジア; タイ; マレーシア; インドネシア; フィリピン;

    JEL classification:

    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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