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How are global value chains fragmented and extended in China's domestic production networks?

Author

Listed:
  • Meng, Bo
  • Wang, Zhi
  • Koopman, Robert

Abstract

Global value chains are supported not only directly by domestic regions that export goods and services to the world market, but also indirectly by other domestic regions that provide parts, components, and intermediate services to final exporting regions. In order to better understand the nature of a country’s position and degree of participation in global value chains, we need to more fully examine the role of individual domestic regions. Understanding the domestic components of global supply chains is especially important for large developing countries like China and India, where there may be large variations in economic scale and development between domestic regions. This paper proposes a new framework for measuring domestic linkages to global value chains. This framework measures domestic linkages by endogenously embedding a country’s domestic interregional input-output (IO) table in an international IO model. Using this framework, we can more clearly describe how global production is fragmented and extended through linkages across a country’s domestic regions. This framework will also enable us to estimate how value added is created and distributed in both domestic and international segments of global value chains. For examining the validity and usefulness of this new approach, some numerical results are presented and discussed based on the 2007 Chinese interregional IO table, China customs statistics at the provincial level, and World Input-Output Tables (WIOTs).

Suggested Citation

  • Meng, Bo & Wang, Zhi & Koopman, Robert, 2013. "How are global value chains fragmented and extended in China's domestic production networks?," IDE Discussion Papers 424, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper424
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    File URL: https://ir.ide.go.jp/?action=repository_action_common_download&item_id=37751&item_no=1&attribute_id=22&file_no=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Meng, Bo & Zhang, Yaxiong & Guo, Jiemin & Fang, Yong, 2012. "China's regional economies and value chains : an interregional input-output analysis," IDE Discussion Papers 359, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    2. Yuqing Xing & Neal Detert, 2011. "How the iPhone Widens the United States Trade Deficit with the People's Republic of China:," Aussenwirtschaft, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science, Swiss Institute for International Economics and Applied Economics Research, vol. 66(03), pages 339-350, September.
    3. Escaith, Hubert, 2008. "Measuring trade in value added in the new industrial economy: statistical implications," MPRA Paper 14454, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Jason Dedrick & Kenneth L. Kraemer & Greg Linden, 2010. "Who profits from innovation in global value chains? A study of the iPod and notebook PCs," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 81-116, February.
    5. Kuroiwa, Ikuo, 2006. "Rules of Origin and Local Content in East Asia," IDE Discussion Papers 78, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    6. Robert Koopman & Zhi Wang & Shang-Jin Wei, 2008. "How Much of Chinese Exports is Really Made In China? Assessing Domestic Value-Added When Processing Trade is Pervasive," NBER Working Papers 14109, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Kiichiro Fukasaku & Bo Meng & Norihiko Yamano, 2011. "Recent Developments in Asian Economic Integration: Measuring Indicators of Trade Integration and Fragmentation," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers 2011/3, OECD Publishing.
    8. Maurer, Andreas & Degain, Christophe, 2010. "Globalization and trade flows: What you see is not what you get!," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2010-12, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Pomfret & Richard Pomfret, 2014. "Expanding the Division of Labour: Trade Costs and Supply Chains in the Global Economy," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 54(3), pages 220-241, November.
    2. Xing, Lizhi & Dong, Xianlei & Guan, Jun, 2017. "Global industrial impact coefficient based on random walk process and inter-country input–output table," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 471(C), pages 576-591.
    3. repec:eee:eneeco:v:63:y:2017:i:c:p:161-173 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Lemoine, Françoise & Poncet, Sandra & Ünal, Deniz, 2015. "Spatial rebalancing and industrial convergence in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 39-63.
    5. Bullón, David & Mena, Tayutic & Meng, Bo & Sánchez, Natalia & Vargas, Henry & Inomata, Satoshi, 2015. "Using the input-output approach to measure participation in GVCs : the case of Costa Rica," IDE Discussion Papers 529, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; Input-output tables; International trade; Distribution; Value chain; Input-output; Trade in value added;

    JEL classification:

    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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