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The Supply Chain Economy: How Far does it Spread in Space and Time?

Author

Listed:
  • Jovanović, Miroslav N.

    (University of Geneva, Global Studies Institute, Dušan Sidjanski Centre of Excellence in European Studies, Geneva, Switzerland)

Abstract

The supply chain economy provides grounds for a non-linear economic leapfrog start in development. Rather than specializing in the whole production procedure, the new model enables specialization in production segments. All process links are related and must be of an identical high standard. The differential treatment of developing countries is therefore not acceptable in this economic model. Statistics provision and trade policy need to change. Duties must be either eliminated or applied on a value-added basis. A new wave of protectionism is testing the spread of the supply chain economy. Three-dimensional printing may pose a challenge to the length and future spread of value chains. L’economia delle ‘supply chain’: quanto possono ‘espandersi’ nello spazio e nel tempo? L’economia delle supply chain è un terreno fertile per uno sviluppo economico non lineare, bensì a singhiozzo. Anziché specializzarsi sull’intero processo produttivo, questo nuovo modello si basa sulla specializzazione in segmenti di produzione. Tutti i segmenti della produzione sono correlati e devono avere gli stessi standard elevati. Perciò, trattamenti differenziati per i paesi in via di sviluppo non sono accettati in questo modello produttivo. Le statistiche e le politiche commerciali devono essere modificate. I dazi devono essere eliminati o applicati sulla base del valore aggiunto. La nuova tendenza protezionistica è un test sulla diffusione dell’economia delle supply chain. Le stampanti 3D potrebbero essere una sfida alla lunghezza ed alla futura diffusione delle catene del valore.

Suggested Citation

  • Jovanović, Miroslav N., 2019. "The Supply Chain Economy: How Far does it Spread in Space and Time?," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 72(4), pages 393-452.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:ecoint:0855
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Global Value Chain; Fragmentation; Unbundling; Offshoring; Trade; Standards; Integration; 3D Printing;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F01 - International Economics - - General - - - Global Outlook
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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