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Shifting Taxes from Labour to Property: A Simulation under Labour Market Equilibrium

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  • Moscarola, Flavia Coda

    () (University of Turin)

  • Colombino, Ugo

    () (University of Turin)

  • Figari, Francesco

    () (University of Insubria)

  • Locatelli, Marilena

    () (University of Turin)

Abstract

A tax shifting from labour income to housing taxation is generally advocated on efficiency grounds. However, most of the empirical literature focuses on the distributional implications of property tax reforms without paying much attention to potential consequences on the labour market. The aim of this paper is to fill this gap by investigating the effects of a tax shifting from labour income to property, guaranteeing revenue neutrality, and to assess the consequences of labour market equilibrium, both on occupation rates and income distribution. We propose to consider a hypothetical tax reform in Italy which uses the revenue of the tax on house property (actually implemented in 2012) for increasing tax credits on low incomes and making them refundable. In order to evaluate the reform we have developed a structural model of household labour supply which takes into account the labour market equilibrium conditions. Overall, the simulated policy provides a more effective income support and better incentives to work for low wage households and determines an improvement in inequality indexes.

Suggested Citation

  • Moscarola, Flavia Coda & Colombino, Ugo & Figari, Francesco & Locatelli, Marilena, 2015. "Shifting Taxes from Labour to Property: A Simulation under Labour Market Equilibrium," IZA Discussion Papers 8832, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8832
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eme:ceapps:cea.2014.293 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. François Bourguignon & Amedeo Spadaro, 2006. "Microsimulation as a tool for evaluating redistribution policies," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 4(1), pages 77-106, April.
    3. John Creedy & Alan Duncan, 2005. "Aggregating Labour Supply and Feedback Effects in Microsimulation," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 8(3), pages 277-290, September.
    4. Olivier Bargain & Kristian Orsini & Andreas Peichl, 2012. "Comparing Labor Supply Elasticities in Europe and the US: New Results," Working Papers halshs-00805736, HAL.
    5. Steinar StrØm & John K. Dagsvik, 2006. "Sectoral labour supply, choice restrictions and functional form," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(6), pages 803-826.
    6. Fabio Berton & Francesco Devicienti & Lia Pacelli, 2011. "Are temporary jobs a port of entry into permanent employment?: Evidence from matched employer-employee," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(8), pages 879-899, November.
    7. Aaberge, Rolf & Colombino, Ugo & Strom, Steinar, 1999. "Labour Supply in Italy: An Empirical Analysis of Joint Household Decisions, with Taxes and Quantity Constraints," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(4), pages 403-422, July-Aug..
    8. Jens Matthias Arnold & Bert Brys & Christopher Heady & Åsa Johansson & Cyrille Schwellnus & Laura Vartia, 2011. "Tax Policy for Economic Recovery and Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(550), pages 59-80, February.
    9. John K. Dagsvik & Marilena Locatelli & Steinar Strøm, 2009. "Tax Reform, Sector-specific Labor Supply and Welfare Effects," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 111(2), pages 299-321, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:revinw:v:63:y:2017:i:3:p:542-563 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Islam, Nizamul & Colombino, Ugo, 2017. "The Case for NIT+FT in Europe: An Empirical Optimal Taxation Exercise," IZA Discussion Papers 11147, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Nico Pestel & Eric Sommer, 2017. "Shifting Taxes from Labor to Consumption: More Employment and more Inequality?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(3), pages 542-563, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labour supply; tax shifting; personal tax on labour income; property tax; labour market equilibrium; microsimulation;

    JEL classification:

    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household

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