IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iza/izadps/dp8560.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Contribution of Managers to Organizational Success: Evidence from German Soccer

Author

Listed:
  • Hentschel, Sandra

    () (University of Bielefeld)

  • Muehlheusser, Gerd

    () (University of Hamburg)

  • Sliwka, Dirk

    () (University of Cologne)

Abstract

We study the impact of managers on the success of professional soccer teams using data from the German "Bundesliga". We evaluate the performance impact of individual managers by estimating regression models that include both team and manager fixed effects, where we are exploiting the high turnover of managers between teams to disentangle the managers' contributions. We find that teams employing a manager at the 75% ability percentile gain on average 0:25 points per game more than those employing a manager at the 25% ability percentile, which corresponds to a sizeable difference of 18% of the average number of points awarded per game. Moreover, estimated abilities have significant predictive power for future performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Hentschel, Sandra & Muehlheusser, Gerd & Sliwka, Dirk, 2014. "The Contribution of Managers to Organizational Success: Evidence from German Soccer," IZA Discussion Papers 8560, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8560
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp8560.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & David N. Margolis, 1999. "High Wage Workers and High Wage Firms," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(2), pages 251-334, March.
    2. Marianne Bertrand & Antoinette Schoar, 2003. "Managing with Style: The Effect of Managers on Firm Policies," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1169-1208.
    3. De Paola, Maria & Scoppa, Vincenzo, 2008. "The Effects of Managerial Turnover: Evidence from Coach Dismissals in Italian Soccer Teams," MPRA Paper 11030, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Hentschel, Sandra & Muehlheusser, Gerd & Sliwka, Dirk, 2012. "The Impact of Managerial Change on Performance: The Role of Team Heterogeneity," IZA Discussion Papers 6884, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Dawson, Peter & Dobson, Stephen & Gerrard, Bill, 2000. "Estimating Coaching Efficiency in Professional Team Sports: Evidence from English Association Football," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 47(4), pages 399-421, September.
    6. Leo Kahane, 2005. "Production Efficiency and Discriminatory Hiring Practices in the National Hockey League: A Stochastic Frontier Approach," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 27(1), pages 47-71, August.
    7. Richard A. Hofler & James E. Payne, 2006. "Efficiency in the National Basketball Association: a stochastic frontier approach with panel data," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 279-285.
    8. John L. Fizel & Michael P. D'Itri, 1997. "Managerial Efficiency, Managerial Succession and Organizational Performance," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 295-308.
    9. Audas, Rick & Dobson, Stephen & Goddard, John, 2002. "The impact of managerial change on team performance in professional sports," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 54(6), pages 633-650.
    10. de Dios Tena, Juan & Forrest, David, 2007. "Within-season dismissal of football coaches: Statistical analysis of causes and consequences," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 181(1), pages 362-373, August.
    11. Peter Dawson & Stephen Dobson, 2002. "Managerial efficiency and human capital: an application to English association football," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(8), pages 471-486.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    managerial skills; human capital; empirical; fixed effects; professional sports;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8560. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak). General contact details of provider: http://www.iza.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.