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Certainty and Severity of Sanctions in Classical and Behavioral Models of Deterrence: A Survey

  • Entorf, Horst

    ()

    (Goethe University Frankfurt)

This survey summarizes the classical fundamentals of modern deterrence theory, covers major theoretical and empirical findings on the impact of certainty and severity of punishment (and the interplay thereof) as well as underlying methodological problems, gives an overview of limitations and extensions motivated by recent findings of behavioral economics and discusses 'rational' deterrence strategies in subcultural societies.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp6516.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6516.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Gerben Bruinsma and David Weisburd (eds), Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Springer, 2014
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6516
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  32. Isaac Ehrlich, 1973. "The Deterrent Effect of Capital Punishment: A Question of Life and Death," NBER Working Papers 0018, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  33. Entorf, Horst & Spengler, Hannes, 2000. "Socioeconomic and demographic factors of crime in Germany: Evidence from panel data of the German states," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 75-106, March.
  34. Steven D. Levitt, 2002. "Using Electoral Cycles in Police Hiring to Estimate the Effects of Police on Crime: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1244-1250, September.
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