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Stigma and Self-Fulfilling Expectations of Criminality

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  • Rasmusen, E.

Abstract

A convicted criminal suffers not only from public penalties but from stigma, the reluctance of others to interact with him economically and socially. Conviction can convey useful information about the convicted, which makes stigmatization an important and legitimate function of the criminal justice system quite apart from moral considerations. The magnitude of stigma depends on expectations and the crime rate, however, which can lead to multiple, Pareto-ranked equilibria with different amounts of crime. Copyright 1996 by the University of Chicago.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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  • Rasmusen, E., 1992. "Stigma and Self-Fulfilling Expectations of Criminality," Papers 92-019, Indiana - Center for Econometric Model Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:indian:92-019
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    Keywords

    crimes ; economic models;

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