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Nice Guys Finish Last: Are People with Higher Tax Morale Taxed More Heavily?

  • Doerrenberg, Philipp

    ()

    (ZEW Mannheim)

  • Duncan, Denvil

    ()

    (Indiana University)

  • Fuest, Clemens

    ()

    (ZEW Mannheim)

  • Peichl, Andreas

    ()

    (ZEW Mannheim)

This paper is the first to provide evidence of efficient taxation of groups with heterogeneous levels of 'tax morale'. We set up an optimal income tax model where high tax morale implies a high subjective cost of evading taxes. The model predicts that 'nice guys finish last': groups with higher tax morale will be taxed more heavily, simply because taxing them is less costly. Based on unique cross-country micro data and an IV approach to rule out reverse causality, we find empirical support for this hypothesis. Income groups with high tax morale systematically face higher average and marginal tax rates.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6275.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6275
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